Videokarma.org

Go Back   Videokarma.org TV - Video - Vintage Television & Radio Forums > Vintage Arcade, Pinball, and MAME

We appreciate your help

in keeping this site going.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-11-2014, 08:53 PM
zenith2134's Avatar
zenith2134 zenith2134 is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 2,440
Did Arcades ever operate 24 hours a day?

If so, do you think they cycled the machines? Those games must have led a hard life...to be played by kids and adults who were rough on the cabinets etc.. But I am wondering if any video arcades were open round the clock. I reckon the games would only operate a year or 2 before the CRTs got weak from constant use if so..
I remember a few cases where old arcades were run til the games were totally burnt up...Games from the likes of Midway and Sega in the 90s...a lot of those developed poor focus or a tinted grayscale but were still in use.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-11-2014, 09:23 PM
CoogarXR's Avatar
CoogarXR CoogarXR is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 610
I know there were a couple in a 24-hour laundromat that I used to live near. I remember Street Fighter II in there, and maybe TMNT, those suckers were on 24/7.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-11-2014, 09:51 PM
zenith2134's Avatar
zenith2134 zenith2134 is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 2,440
Cool. I am interested in this stuff...Do you guys think that some of these games used special tubes, perhaps ruggedized cathodes for longevity, or vibration-resistant? I know some mil-spec tubes were made, for raster-graphics color monitors, but what about the gaming sector? I mean, before the crash of '83, the video arcade industry was a HUGE money maker..
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-11-2014, 10:40 PM
MIPS's Avatar
MIPS MIPS is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: West Canadia
Posts: 439
If they run arcades 24/7 in Japan right now with modern LCD based cabinets I have no reason to believe that they were not doing the same with CRT cabinets back in the 90's and early 00's.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-12-2014, 11:26 AM
CoogarXR's Avatar
CoogarXR CoogarXR is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 610
I know there are some guys on here who worked on arcade monitors back in the heyday. I am sure they'll chime in with the facts.
Reply With Quote
Audiokarma
  #6  
Old 12-13-2014, 07:31 PM
rca2000's Avatar
rca2000 rca2000 is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: cincinnati,ohio
Posts: 2,096
24 times 365 + 8760 hours...I am SURE any decent CRT could outlast that long. At least the ones made "in the day" of the arcade games. I would say at least 25K hours or so... Maybe not the modern chineese junk though.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-13-2014, 10:15 PM
Username1's Avatar
Username1 Username1 is offline
Not sure how I got here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Orange County NY
Posts: 3,466
I did, many were on all day, and all night..... Never saw a bad tube, the ones I worked on
I always turned the brightness down...... And vector screens always looked like new....
Actually there was only 1 with a weak tube, it was a table game, and it was really old...
I don't even remember what it was, and I only saw one of them....

The ones that looked like they had bad focus most likely was just dirt. I use to open them
up and clean the screens and the plastic and it was almost twice as bright when I was done.
retouch the focus control and it was good for another 500,000 hours.

I had one screen where I had to replace a driver chip in one because it had poor contrast.

The company I worked for after a game got really played out they would get a new board
graphics, replace the control panel, and out it would go again..... same old screen....

Besides the hand controls and coin mechanism, most problems were power supply, and for
that, unless it was a top of the line company like Sega, Atari, or Midway, it was just a little
$50. box that for the most part we just replaced as a unit. Top companies had real power supplies
with a giant transformer, no switching power supplies.

I think all that stuff was designed to be on all the time.... New they sold for $5K so no games
with reliability....

.
__________________
Yes you can call me "Squirrel boy"

Last edited by Username1; 12-13-2014 at 10:31 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-17-2014, 02:59 AM
ChrisW6ATV's Avatar
ChrisW6ATV ChrisW6ATV is offline
Another CT-100 lives!
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Hayward, Cal. USA
Posts: 3,308
Yes indeed, many arcades were open 24 hours per day in the 1980s.

No, the CRTs were not special, industrial-grade ones. In the monitors I first worked on in 1981, many games (from Williams, Stern, Taito, and Bally/Midway at least) had a monitor chassis that was a customized version of a regular JVC color TV set, with a 19VJTP22 CRT.

Plenty of CRTs, even color ones, can operate 24 hours per day for years. I have some at my work place (a large airport) that still look bright and clear, and I installed them in late 1999 and have never turned them off except for occasional servicing or power shutdowns. As Username1 mentioned, I made sure to set them to moderate brightness and contrast.
__________________
Chris

Quote from another forum: "(Antique TV collecting) always seemed to me to be a fringe hobby that only weirdos did."
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-17-2014, 04:25 PM
zenith2134's Avatar
zenith2134 zenith2134 is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 2,440
Ah, the good ol 19VJTP22. Have seen a large volume of those in-line CRTs in many 1980s TV brands, from Panasonic all the way to RCA.
SO I guess my question is answered. I miss the old video arcades
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-20-2014, 06:33 PM
rca2000's Avatar
rca2000 rca2000 is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: cincinnati,ohio
Posts: 2,096
I can see how a CRT would last a lot longer being used in a " vector" format.

Think about it. Over 90% of the screen...and therefore cathode..goes UNUSED at any given time. SO wear would be seriously decreased . Sure "burn " would be a real problem-- ( and WAS--even 30 or so years ago on games I played like centipede, ) even more so than a normal raster display which has a "background" glow, and is always lit to some degree. But the cathodes and phospor as a whole would seem to last a LOT longer. I doubt many games had the tubes replaced for burns unless it got to be so bad they were not useable.

In FACT..I would hazard to say...that LCD panels would last LESS time in a vector display than a CRT , given the BL has to be on ALL the time--other than modulated BL ones--(and I doubt any arcade games use them).. and so they would wear out quicker that way. Not too mention...there would be a bit of "glow through" on ANY LCD used in a vector display from said BL..
Reply With Quote
Audiokarma
  #11  
Old 12-23-2014, 09:58 PM
ChrisW6ATV's Avatar
ChrisW6ATV ChrisW6ATV is offline
Another CT-100 lives!
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Hayward, Cal. USA
Posts: 3,308
I don't think there can be such a thing as a vector-based LCD. LCD panels themselves are directly addressed pixel by pixel. Perhaps a vector-input circuit could be made that converts to pixel addressing, the way analog raster-scan-type input circuits are used on LCDs now.
__________________
Chris

Quote from another forum: "(Antique TV collecting) always seemed to me to be a fringe hobby that only weirdos did."
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-26-2014, 01:37 AM
Dude111 Dude111 is offline
Analogue is Awesome
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 1,717
I sure do mi$$ arcades!!!!!

THERE ARE SOME GAMES IN MOVIE THEATERS BUT THEY ARE GARBAGE,nothing good from the 80s...
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-26-2014, 02:04 AM
rca2000's Avatar
rca2000 rca2000 is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: cincinnati,ohio
Posts: 2,096
Tell me about it...


Northgate mall USED to have a nice game room. Big and with plenty of nice popular games. I was there a few times, along with other malls ALl of them had plenty of nice games...THEN..

But NOW....Northgate mall has a PISS_-POOR game room, tiny , and only a few games, mainly for children--like those "claw " games and such..A FAR cry from 1979--1995 or so...
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12-27-2014, 05:51 PM
Username1's Avatar
Username1 Username1 is offline
Not sure how I got here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Orange County NY
Posts: 3,466
So I guess we need a multi-seat time machine.....

The vector games had not a great range to the brightness, turn them up just a little
and the lets call the reposition lines would begin to show..... So you could not turn
them up to the point of damaging the screens.... The only bad thing was that when
they were on, stuff like top score, and game title were displayed in the same spot,
the teaser stuff. But I never saw a vector game with a weak, or damaged screen...

And you are right, the guns were on only while painting the lines on the screen..... Bright
as you want, still on only .001% of the time of a scan line set for their entire life....

.
__________________
Yes you can call me "Squirrel boy"
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-16-2015, 10:08 PM
tvcollector's Avatar
tvcollector tvcollector is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 1,556
I own two arcade machines.. Both are Mortal Kombat 2 and Ultimate 3.. I bought them back in the 1990s for 1k each.. I also had a few 80s machines.. Teenage Mutant Nija Turtles, and Double Dragon and Shinobi.. All three of those sadly were in my garage at the time that had bars for windows with no glass pains, so the climate killed the machines and I ended up having to take them to the road when we had to move out.. I called a friend and told them to get the machines or they are going to be in the land fill..

What I've noticed with arcade machines especially from the 1980s, is alot of phosphor burn in the TV monitors.. Usually it was "Insert Coin" or the name of the game that was constantly flashing on the screen when the game was not being played...
__________________
Looking for an all tube or hybrid color TV set from the late 1960s, early 1970s that's in a steal cabinet..
Reply With Quote
Audiokarma
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:51 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
ęCopyright 2012 VideoKarma.org, All rights reserved.