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  #1  
Old 07-07-2014, 10:53 AM
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Fairlane500skyliner Fairlane500skyliner is offline
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Smile Recent HMV haul

I recently embarked on a 12-hour drive south to Canberra (where I currently am until later in the week), and made a stop along the way to visit a fellow collector (RetroFormat32) and make a trade. I ended up trading several 1970s/80s colour sets and an early 1990s B&W portable for two vintage B&Ws - a 1960 HMV "Rangemaster" P1-AH and 1970 HMV "Trent" V6-BN. I also had a HMV at my dad's house in Canberra - a 1968 HMV "Wentworth" PU-AF that had been rescued for $50 from a recycling centre shop.

The HMV Rangemaster in the first photo is in rough shape. I was originally considering stripping it down for parts, but have since changed my mind. I've only ever seen one other of these, and it's a relatively old set, so it's worthy of restoration. Even if the CRT is buggered or the chassis requires some "unobtanium" part, it will make a nice "display-only" set when the cabinet is finished (same for any set of the era that can't be electronically restored). It will need a fair bit of work - Refinishing the cabinet, re-building the bottom of the cabinet, replacing the tuning scale, finding four knobs, re-plating the badges, and repairing a missing chunk on the plastic control panel.

The HMV Trent is in much better shape. The cabinet top and sides need to be stripped and re-finished, the legs need to be re-finished (as with most low-boys), and I need to find a replacement knob for it (as one is missing). Electronically, it's already had some work done by someone else, though is still suffering from loss of vertical deflection.

The HMV Wentworth is, aside from some small nicks, essentially mint. It's been very well looked after, though was quite dusty inside. The set is suffering from a problem in the Horiz. Output/EHT circuits, resulting in the EHT from the flyback (haven't yet checked the voltage on the circuit diagram) failing to reach the CRT. I've checked the usual suspect resistors and tubes to no avail, so I'll look into it closer at a later stage.

I also have a 1965 HMV "Windsor" V1-AH console in my collection (last two photos), so the addition of the Rangemaster and Wentworth means that I have a complete line-up of the three HMV console television styles of the 1960s. HMV low-boys of the era used the same designs and went through the same design changes as their console counterparts, so I can pretty much say that I have a line-up of the three main HMV television styles from 1960s Australia.

I have developed quite a liking for the mid-1960s to early-1970s HMVs due to their "serviceman-friendly" chassis. The "drop-down" design enables unobstructed and easy access to both sides of the chassis, as well as the other components (tuner, CRT and speakers). I'd like to eventually build up a larger collection of 1960s and possibly early-1970s HMV sets, as the easy-access chassis and appealing design make them nice sets to work on and collect.

EDIT: Be sure to check out my Youtube videos of the sets! There are several restoration-progress videos for the HMV Windsor.

1960 HMV Rangemaster - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWSDh2TiZj4
1965 HMV Windsor - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYUgni30mjE
1968 HMV Wentworth - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CILlokJuk8s
1970 HMV Trent - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOKxHq9E_N4

Chris
Attached Images
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File Type: jpg IMG_2526.jpg (73.0 KB, 39 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_2527.jpg (83.8 KB, 35 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_2507.jpg (84.3 KB, 62 views)
File Type: jpg 1511212_900647139962083_8445067585434591092_n.jpg (47.5 KB, 36 views)
File Type: jpg Chris HMV Windsor.jpg (48.1 KB, 46 views)

Last edited by Fairlane500skyliner; 07-07-2014 at 11:02 AM.
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  #2  
Old 07-08-2014, 03:47 PM
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Very neat photos.
Just like Mad Max's obvious Ford product in the first movie, the sets look vaguely familiar but...the're from the opposite side of the planet.
That Rangemaster control panel escutcheaon looks like a 1959 General Electric, I would not give up on that!

Im sure someone here can Xplain the connection between HMV (His Master's Voice) and (RCA) Radio Corporation of America.
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Old 07-08-2014, 05:55 PM
snelson903 snelson903 is offline
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interesting tv's, i like the flip down chassie looks like it would be easy to work on.
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Old 07-08-2014, 11:06 PM
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Fairlane500skyliner Fairlane500skyliner is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavGoodlin View Post
Very neat photos.
Just like Mad Max's obvious Ford product in the first movie, the sets look vaguely familiar but...the're from the opposite side of the planet.
That Rangemaster control panel escutcheaon looks like a 1959 General Electric, I would not give up on that!

Im sure someone here can Xplain the connection between HMV (His Master's Voice) and (RCA) Radio Corporation of America.
The Rangemaster has a very similar front-cabinet design to the 1958 GE 21C2465. I know there were connections between AWA and RCA from 1956 onwards (for how long, I don't know). AWA used some RCA cabinet and chassis designs for their sets, as television only came about in 1956 here, and they didn't have the knowledge or experience at the time. I don't think HMV had any connections with RCA or any other American manufacturers at the time, though I may be wrong. There is very little information around for Australian televisions and manufacturers.

Chris
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  #5  
Old 07-08-2014, 11:09 PM
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Fairlane500skyliner Fairlane500skyliner is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snelson903 View Post
interesting tv's, i like the flip down chassie looks like it would be easy to work on.
These sets are a "Serviceman's dream". They are incredibly easy to work on, and you can access everything inside the set with ease. My only complaint with the design is that the tuner is wires directly into the chassis. The addition of some plugs and sockets to easily disconnect the tuner would be good, so the entire chassis could be unplugged and removed for extensive work.

Chris
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  #6  
Old 07-12-2014, 02:17 AM
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nice haul... indeed..
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  #7  
Old 07-13-2014, 12:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairlane500skyliner View Post
The Rangemaster has a very similar front-cabinet design to the 1958 GE 21C2465. I know there were connections between AWA and RCA from 1956 onwards (for how long, I don't know). AWA used some RCA cabinet and chassis designs for their sets, as television only came about in 1956 here, and they didn't have the knowledge or experience at the time. I don't think HMV had any connections with RCA or any other American manufacturers at the time, though I may be wrong. There is very little information around for Australian televisions and manufacturers.

Chris
I was wondering about the use of the phrase "His Master's Voice" in connection with televisions not manufactured by RCA Victor; after all, that phrase was a copyrighted service mark for decades of the Radio Corporation of America. It may still be under copyright to Thomson, which now owns the rights to the RCA block-letter trademark which was used on RCA radios, televisions, etc. from 1968 to the present day.

I am by no means certain, but the original circular RCA trademark may still be under copyright as well. Trademark owners are very particular about how the symbols and/or phrases are used and by whom, especially in this day and age of intellectual property protection. RCA (NBC), as an example, has blocked the use of the call sign of its formerly-operated radio stations by any other AM or FM radio station in this country, which is why you will never hear any radio station in the 21st century and beyond signing its call letters as WNBC and/or WNBC-FM--even if the stations are affiliated with the current iteration of the NBC radio network. These call letters are the exclusive property of NBCUniversal, and they will do everything and anything in their power to protect their rights to them. I'm sure stations WABC-AM and WABC-FM (the latter now WPLJ-FM) have the same arrangement to protect those call signs from unauthorized use. WCBS-AM-FM and television are the only network stations in the New York City area that still use the same call sign on all three stations, although I am sure CBS has a copyright protecting those call signs from being used anywhere else, in case the stations should change callsigns for any reason.
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Old 07-13-2014, 12:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffhs View Post
I was wondering about the use of the phrase "His Master's Voice" in connection with televisions not manufactured by RCA Victor; after all, that phrase was a copyrighted service mark for decades of the Radio Corporation of America.
Wiki has a decent page about HMV, RCA, JVC and Nipper here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/His_Master%27s_Voice

jr
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Old 07-13-2014, 12:57 AM
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HMV and Little Nipper

The RCA "Nipper" and His Master's Voice goes back a very very long way to the Victor Talking Machine Co. (USA) and The Gramophone Co. (UK) at the turn of the 20th century and exchange of copyrights etc.

Nipper was in fact a real dog. (1884-1895) Painted listening to a cylinder record ... repainted with a gramophone the painting became the trademark for Victor and HMV (UK).

So RCA (which bought Victor in the 1920s) owns the trademark for the US and HMV (UK) for outside the US.

HMV/EMI was part of the consortium that developed 405 line tv in the 1930s.

Like RCA ... now just brand name for Warner or Universal or Sony.
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  #10  
Old 12-24-2016, 03:52 AM
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If the CRT's are good in those sets the resto should be fairly easy as they will have polyester caps rather than paper ones. You may find a few high value resistors and a few low emission valves but other than that they should come up well. The middle console looks mint cabinet wise. It's hard to find good resto prospects in Aus so a great haul you have there.
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  #11  
Old 12-25-2016, 01:56 PM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairlane500skyliner View Post
I recently embarked on a 12-hour drive south to Canberra (where I currently am until later in the week), and made a stop along the way to visit a fellow collector (RetroFormat32) and make a trade. I ended up trading several 1970s/80s colour sets and an early 1990s B&W portable for two vintage B&Ws - a 1960 HMV "Rangemaster" P1-AH and 1970 HMV "Trent" V6-BN. I also had a HMV at my dad's house in Canberra - a 1968 HMV "Wentworth" PU-AF that had been rescued for $50 from a recycling centre shop.

The HMV Rangemaster in the first photo is in rough shape. I was originally considering stripping it down for parts, but have since changed my mind. I've only ever seen one other of these, and it's a relatively old set, so it's worthy of restoration. Even if the CRT is buggered or the chassis requires some "unobtanium" part, it will make a nice "display-only" set when the cabinet is finished (same for any set of the era that can't be electronically restored). It will need a fair bit of work - Refinishing the cabinet, re-building the bottom of the cabinet, replacing the tuning scale, finding four knobs, re-plating the badges, and repairing a missing chunk on the plastic control panel.

The HMV Trent is in much better shape. The cabinet top and sides need to be stripped and re-finished, the legs need to be re-finished (as with most low-boys), and I need to find a replacement knob for it (as one is missing). Electronically, it's already had some work done by someone else, though is still suffering from loss of vertical deflection.

The HMV Wentworth is, aside from some small nicks, essentially mint. It's been very well looked after, though was quite dusty inside. The set is suffering from a problem in the Horiz. Output/EHT circuits, resulting in the EHT from the flyback (haven't yet checked the voltage on the circuit diagram) failing to reach the CRT. I've checked the usual suspect resistors and tubes to no avail, so I'll look into it closer at a later stage.

I also have a 1965 HMV "Windsor" V1-AH console in my collection (last two photos), so the addition of the Rangemaster and Wentworth means that I have a complete line-up of the three HMV console television styles of the 1960s. HMV low-boys of the era used the same designs and went through the same design changes as their console counterparts, so I can pretty much say that I have a line-up of the three main HMV television styles from 1960s Australia.

I have developed quite a liking for the mid-1960s to early-1970s HMVs due to their "serviceman-friendly" chassis. The "drop-down" design enables unobstructed and easy access to both sides of the chassis, as well as the other components (tuner, CRT and speakers). I'd like to eventually build up a larger collection of 1960s and possibly early-1970s HMV sets, as the easy-access chassis and appealing design make them nice sets to work on and collect.

EDIT: Be sure to check out my Youtube videos of the sets! There are several restoration-progress videos for the HMV Windsor.

1960 HMV Rangemaster - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWSDh2TiZj4
1965 HMV Windsor - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYUgni30mjE
1968 HMV Wentworth - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CILlokJuk8s
1970 HMV Trent - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOKxHq9E_N4

Chris
I'd like to see the Schematic of the set. Schematics are the universal language of the collector crowd!
The set sure looks like it was built in Chicago, USA.
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