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  #31  
Old 10-26-2007, 03:28 AM
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ChrisW6ATV ChrisW6ATV is offline
Another CT-100 lives!
 
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I found the "secret" menu on my Digix Media DVD player, and it does have a "defeat" settibg as well as region-code settings. I am going to try it with a test DVD on my CTC-5, then buy a DVD of early color Bonanza episodes to play on it.
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  #32  
Old 10-26-2007, 05:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony V View Post
This kit looks like the answer to alot of playback problems we have when using vintage tv's and i look forward to purchasing one soon. One question i have though since it hasnt been asked so far...does one of these help with playback when using a VCR also? Just curious as some of us have some vintage tv shows on vhs and of course using a VCR at least for me hasnt been the best experience when playing it on a vintage tv. As far as the m-word i could care less as i never had the interest to duplicate tapes or dvd's anyway, i just want a decent picture when i fire up my roundie whether its old tv shows or a new movie.
-Tony
It depends on what problem you are having. Trash in the blanking interval on VHS will cause white lines, just as it does with DVDs. It also contributes to instability, however..... There is another separate problem with VHS. There are rather severe timebase errors that are the root cause of instability in the picture.

Our older sets were designed to play NTSC spec video, over the air. It was assumed that the transmitter would be extremely stable, because the FCC required it to be. The sync sections in the old sets were designed with a "flywheel effect". If a few sync pulses were lost to interference, the picture would not destabilize. The watcher may not have even noticed.

VHS on the other hand, is not extremely stable, quite the opposite. The video is recorded in diagonal slices across the tape, and while there is nothing inherently wrong with that method, the slices do have to be put back together on playback. In the case of VHS, it doesn't get done very accurately.

When the slices get put back together, the time between the sync pulses does not always come out right. An old set will display exactly what VHS gives it, a picture that waves all over the place.

Modern sets use a different method. They do not have the flywheel effect. If a sync pulse comes, a line or frame starts. This has the effect of putting the beginning of each line more or less where it belongs. The playback is much better. This is not because the set is more stable, but because it is less stable.....

I am using a JVC VCR with a timebase corrector. As far as I know they are the only company that offers this on a consumer grade VCR. I haven't looked lately but usually their TOTL model has it. All of the instability goes away when you hit the TBC button. One thing you might not expect is that the color improves too. The difference is staggering, even on modern sets.

John
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  #33  
Old 10-26-2007, 10:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blue_lateral View Post
It depends on what problem you are having. Trash in the blanking interval on VHS will cause white lines, just as it does with DVDs. It also contributes to instability, however..... There is another separate problem with VHS. There are rather severe timebase errors that are the root cause of instability in the picture.

Our older sets were designed to play NTSC spec video, over the air. It was assumed that the transmitter would be extremely stable, because the FCC required it to be. The sync sections in the old sets were designed with a "flywheel effect". If a few sync pulses were lost to interference, the picture would not destabilize. The watcher may not have even noticed.

VHS on the other hand, is not extremely stable, quite the opposite. The video is recorded in diagonal slices across the tape, and while there is nothing inherently wrong with that method, the slices do have to be put back together on playback. In the case of VHS, it doesn't get done very accurately.

When the slices get put back together, the time between the sync pulses does not always come out right. An old set will display exactly what VHS gives it, a picture that waves all over the place.

Modern sets use a different method. They do not have the flywheel effect. If a sync pulse comes, a line or frame starts. This has the effect of putting the beginning of each line more or less where it belongs. The playback is much better. This is not because the set is more stable, but because it is less stable.....

I am using a JVC VCR with a timebase corrector. As far as I know they are the only company that offers this on a consumer grade VCR. I haven't looked lately but usually their TOTL model has it. All of the instability goes away when you hit the TBC button. One thing you might not expect is that the color improves too. The difference is staggering, even on modern sets.

John
.
Right on John ! I also have a JVC VCR with TBC (Time Base Correction) and it works fantastic. Without it the VHS picture is unstable, waving and jittering all over the place. With the TBC turned on the picture is rock solid with no fluttering, waving, tearing, or jittering at the top of the picture.

The things we have to go through to watch our vintage TV's !

Bob
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  #34  
Old 10-26-2007, 12:21 PM
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It's also possible to modify the sync circuit to make vintage TVs work with VCRs. I've done this before with good results, but it's not something for the beginner. With video tape quickly disappearing and inexpensive VCRs with TBCs, I wouldn't recommend this now.

The Panasonic AG-1970 and 1980 are excellent VCRs with TBCs. They are often very cheap because most of them need re-capping like out vintage TVs.
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  #35  
Old 10-26-2007, 01:38 PM
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The modifications for various 70s TVs were listed in the Serviceman column of Electronics Australia magazine, I have those issues around somewhere. Perhaps a similar magazine covered the modifications for some vintage NTSC sets?

Several manufacturers included TBCs in their high end consumer VCRs. I have JVC and Loewe (built by Hitachi?) S-VHS VCRs with TBCs. I've seen at least one Panasonic consumer S-VHS VCR with a TBC. With so many people abandoning VHS some very nice VCRs (including pro editting decks) are being sold very cheaply.
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  #36  
Old 10-26-2007, 11:57 PM
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Thanks guys for a very informative explanation. Luckily alot of the old shows are now beginning to be released on DVD so this kit will come in very handy. The thing i like about it also is that its an external fix so no modification needs to be done to the sets themselves and they can be left in their original state.
-Tony
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  #37  
Old 10-31-2007, 06:26 PM
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Hey guys I dont know why this is working so well, but I have a cheap-o RCA VHS VCR. Newer one and it's taking the retrace out of every DVD I play on my ctc-16. I use an RCA DVD player. Go figure. The Pic looks great too, no flashing and no retrace lines or instability issues at all!
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  #38  
Old 10-31-2007, 09:04 PM
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Talking

At the formal opening of our museum in Windsor CT last Saturday we had a CTC-11, a CTC-9 (anniversary model), and a completely restored and operating CT-100. The 9 did not get along at all with the DVD encoded with Macrovision, but the 11 was more tolerant. The CT-100, however, showed a splendid display with no "jitters" or fading. The lines in the upper left corner were present, but did not make a difference in picture stability, or brightness, etc.
The CT-100 is cabinet # 827.
Kevin G.
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