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  #61  
Old 06-17-2018, 07:23 PM
mbates14 mbates14 is offline
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I know a few people that have had nothing but problems with modern machines and front loaders. the boots go bad and leak, but then the aluminum drum drive spline corrodes and breaks/falls apart on some models, they are all moving to brushless DC motor systems and those control boards are failing at an alarming rate on some models.

I have a pair of mid to late 80s models, matched set washer and dryer. they are still going strong. I bought those on purpose just because I knew of their reliability. All mechanical, no electronics.
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  #62  
Old 06-17-2018, 07:32 PM
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init4fun init4fun is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbates14 View Post
I know a few people that have had nothing but problems with modern machines and front loaders. the boots go bad and leak, but then the aluminum drum drive spline corrodes and breaks/falls apart on some models, they are all moving to brushless DC motor systems and those control boards are failing at an alarming rate on some models.

I have a pair of mid to late 80s models, matched set washer and dryer. they are still going strong. I bought those on purpose just because I knew of their reliability. All mechanical, no electronics.
The top loader has been perfected over the last 100 years to do one thing and one thing only , wash clothes . Now along comes the front loader with it's mandate to not only wash clothes , but to save water & electricity while washing those clothes . Anytime you put such compromises into a machine's design there is no way it's gonna outperform the machine that has clean clothes , and not saving water & electricity , as it's principal design consideration .

Like you , I'll cling to my beloved top loader till the eco freaks pry it from my mostly clean hands ....
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  #63  
Old 06-17-2018, 07:35 PM
mbates14 mbates14 is offline
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Thats why I dont like modern appliances. they are trying to stuff too much technology in them.

Even though my dayjob is in the technology industry, I personally feel there is a place for technology, and there is a place where its not needed. Like refrigerators that need 10 different PCBs and be connected to the internet. Ridiculous.

Or using control boards with relays that have no contact arc protection snubbers = consistent failures.
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  #64  
Old 06-17-2018, 07:56 PM
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init4fun init4fun is offline
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Agreed 100% !

My gas fired forced hot air furnace would kill a main circuit board every 5 years of so for the same failure every time , the tiny relay the manufacturer used to control the 1/2 HP blower motor would have it's contacts literally evaporated . After 3 boards in like 13 years I finally bought a properly rated "Omron" relay which I mounted to the side of the control box , threw a couple of snubbers across the contacts , and that relay (with it's see through plastic case) has barely even pitted it's contacts some 10 years later .

And a fridge connected to the internet ? Oh no no no , not in any house I own !

And the same goes for the crapper when they finally come up with a way to hook THAT up to the net as well ...
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  #65  
Old 06-18-2018, 04:11 AM
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Telecolor 3007 Telecolor 3007 is offline
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In Europe we had a lot of top loaders in the old days, but they where semiatuomatic machines, not automatic ones. The French where manufacturing in the '60's top loading automatics in stad of front loading.
Top loaders are more relabile, can fit in apartaments if the apartament is a little bit bigger (in Romania most people try to keep the washing machine in bathroom), but you can't put anaything above it. I do personaly like fron loaders because I can see what happens inside the drum.

I do have an issue with modern machines becuase they don't use too much water on the rising program. I do use suplimentary rising anyway (I like to put more detergent cause I do get stinky quite fast). Besides that the fact than you can set only one suplimentary rising cylcle at the "L.G." washing machine, I have to pour water when suplimentary rising, 'cause it's using a too small quantity of water.
I had an "Indesit". Besides it was an Ideshit (very unrelaible), I could pour more water on the washing cycle without evacuating it and it used more water on the rising + after the washing program, I could select 2 or 3 suplimentary risings.
Stupid icologists (not ecologists).

I need and old made to last machine (I can accomodate 2 in the place where I live). But you most be carefoul not to take skin deases.
Heh, in the '60's the West-German companies "Bauknecht" and "Constructa" made some home-use washing machines that could was at 100 ░ C
Old machines where made to last. Unfortunately, the spining speed for the "drying" wasn't big (only in the '80's I think they had 700 r.p.m.s) and you couldn't adjust it. But a late '80's or a '90's machine can be good and have a lot of facilities. Only to be lucky to find one from a relabile source
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Last edited by Telecolor 3007; 06-18-2018 at 04:16 AM.
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  #66  
Old 06-18-2018, 06:38 AM
Colly0410 Colly0410 is offline
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When I was a kid (1960's) we had a twin tub top loader washer: it had a normal agitator tub with a spin dryer/rinse thing at the side. You had to put a hose on the hot or cold tap (faucet) to fill it, you'd wash the cleanest clothes first then dad's (& later mine) dirty overalls/work clothes (he & then later I then worked at a coal mine) went in last. You'd have to lift the now clean clothes out of the tub using a pair of wooden tongues into the spin dryer/rinse thing, you'd spin them, then refill using the hose attached to the cold tap & rinse & spin about 3/4 times, the outlet came out of a pipe into the sink . Wash day (usually a Monday for some reason) was an all day affair. Not like nowadays when you see the wash basket getting a bit full you bung a wash in the washer & leave it to get on with it...
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  #67  
Old 06-18-2018, 08:56 AM
zeno zeno is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by init4fun View Post
The top loader has been perfected over the last 100 years to do one thing and one thing only , wash clothes . Now along comes the front loader with it's mandate to not only wash clothes , but to save water & electricity while washing those clothes . Anytime you put such compromises into a machine's design there is no way it's gonna outperform the machine that has clean clothes , and not saving water & electricity , as it's principal design consideration .

Like you , I'll cling to my beloved top loader till the eco freaks pry it from my mostly clean hands ....
Absolutely the best summary of the problem.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dq6T5BojXc8

I will add a question. What uses more energy?? Replacing an appliance
every 5 yrs & recycling it then building a new POS & shipping it
a thousand miles ? OR using more water & electric and keeping it
20-40 yrs ?
BTW Speed Queen that was the last real washer has now had a re design.
The also raised the price by abt $100. I got mine just before. My still
running abt 40 yr old Maytag is in the cellar waiting for its next
assignment. The delivery men really wanted to take it away !
Gee I wonder why ?
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  #68  
Old 06-18-2018, 10:11 PM
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bgadow bgadow is offline
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We finally replaced our 1991 GE top loader (& matching dryer) earlier this year. The transmission was going up. Left to my own I'd just find a good used Whirlpool top loader but the "boss" (she hates when I call her that!) wanted something other than white. You can't buy new models in almond to match what we had. After much research I went with a nice looking gray Maytag pair, top load washer with a skinny agitator. It's sure a totally different animal from the old Filter-Flo GE but it's very quiet & does a good job at cleaning clothes and can handle our biggest bedspread without complaint. American made by Whirlpool. Hopefully the electronics hold out.
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  #69  
Old 06-19-2018, 01:04 AM
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Telecolor 3007 Telecolor 3007 is offline
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Transmision = belt?
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  #70  
Old 06-19-2018, 08:34 PM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Telecolor 3007 View Post
Transmision = belt?
There was a form of a transmission in them, either a direct drive or belt drive.
An aluminum gear case that provided speed changes between wash and spin speeds. Design has changed in the last 30 years. I didn't keep up with the changes.
The last time, I bought new machines was 15 years ago. Top load Whirlpool Gold line and matching electric dryer.
The name plate states: Heavy Duty, Commercial Quality.
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  #71  
Old 06-20-2018, 01:17 PM
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davet753 davet753 is offline
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I just bought a new GE top loader last year, and its a real piece of garbage. Not only does it not allow enough water for the rinse cycle, it doesn't allow enough for the wash, either. They can put tubs the sixe of Texas in them, but if the machine wont allow it to fill over half way, it isn't gonna work.

Plus, when washing a load of towels (or anything else heavy) it shuts down leaving everything soaking wet because the balancing system is so bad it can't run through the spin cycle. GE is too cheap to put a brake on the tub, so they lock the lid instead and make you wait several minutes before it will unlock.

I guess I'll just have to break down and spend the money for a Speed Queen if I want to get a decent machine. They're about the only ones left that make what is, truly, a heavy duty machine designed for commercial use. Maytag built the best top loaders in their Newton, Iowa plant until Whirlpool bought them out. The first thing Whirlpool done was close the plant, put the Maytag name on a Whirlpool machine and add $100 to the price tag. They knew people would pay more for a machine with the Maytag name on it (even though it was just a Whirlpool under the skin). Sad.
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  #72  
Old 06-20-2018, 04:29 PM
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Telecolor 3007 Telecolor 3007 is offline
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New washing machines are using a very low quantity of water. I think that's a crap, but you know "envoriment protection", "let's low down the carbon amprent"... people who never see what people are doing in theyr houses decide for us. Don't get me wrong, I pro envoirement protection, but let us not fall into stupidity.
I don't buy that thing that modern detergent are so good that isn't necesarly to put to many into the machine. In fact I add detergent for hand washing, so I willl get more foam.
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  #73  
Old 06-20-2018, 04:59 PM
fixmeplease fixmeplease is offline
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For whatever its worth, Im really old school with washing. I use a 1935 Maytag wringer washer about 7 months out of the year fall/winter/spring. I paid $2 for it 20 years ago but they cost a lot more now, maybe $50 for this style, for yard art. 1 load of hot water, maybe 14 gallons?, and that will wash multiple loads, everything I have. I dont do towels in the same water. Maybe 20 gallons of cold water for rinse. motor uses, if I remember right, 240 watts. It takes a couple hours to do of course, and is hands on. I like the darned thing. When you have something super dirty you just run it longer. Quite controllable and blends in with all the other old crap here.

I have an old maytag from the 80's? that leaks water and I use that in warm weather outside, with cold water being heated outdoors by the sun in a very long garden hose so the hot water is free. I paid $50 for it used.

So, for $52, plus new paint for the ringer, and an initial repair on the wringer that took a day, I have been washing clothes for 20 years, plus soap, electric, and water of course.

Of the 2 washers the wringer does a better job but is more work. I want no part of a new washer thats just gonna need replacing in a few years when Im broke. The wringer is good exercise in cold weather too
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  #74  
Old 06-21-2018, 11:12 AM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colly0410 View Post
When I was a kid (1960's) we had a twin tub top loader washer: it had a normal agitator tub with a spin dryer/rinse thing at the side. You had to put a hose on the hot or cold tap (faucet) to fill it, you'd wash the cleanest clothes first then dad's (& later mine) dirty overalls/work clothes (he & then later I then worked at a coal mine) went in last. You'd have to lift the now clean clothes out of the tub using a pair of wooden tongues into the spin dryer/rinse thing, you'd spin them, then refill using the hose attached to the cold tap & rinse & spin about 3/4 times, the outlet came out of a pipe into the sink . Wash day (usually a Monday for some reason) was an all day affair. Not like nowadays when you see the wash basket getting a bit full you bung a wash in the washer & leave it to get on with it...
Was that a US made Easy brand. Easy spin driers were designed like that. Most of the owner's liked them rather well.
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  #75  
Old 06-21-2018, 04:46 PM
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mr_rye89 mr_rye89 is offline
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I got a used stacking side loader washer/dryer early this year, Whirlpool made Maytag (washer made in Germany, Dryer in USA) from '08 and I like them better than my old conventional set. The washer did throw an error code once a few weeks ago, but the voltage was a bit low across the whole house. It was built in the era of bad capacitors, So I might have a look inside of it when I replace the floor in my laundry room (and have the dryer off of it)

I'm not worried about the door seal in mine, as it doesn't run the water that high. also the lack of an agitator is great for bedspreads and stuff
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