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  #16  
Old 05-17-2018, 09:43 AM
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i was given an outdoor antenna when i was around 12 years old.hooked it up and could receive pretty clear video from almost 200 miles away.in columbus,ohio but got cincinnati,cleveland,dayton stations that were very watchable.when cable tv came through here in the very early 70s,it had the same stations i was getting.
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  #17  
Old 05-17-2018, 10:01 AM
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Because of time of day variation of refraction, I wonder if UHF would be reliably better than VHF during evening hours?

If we could get an idea of what stations people were watching on their monochrome sets in the evening, that would give an indication of the probable color availability. A local newspaper listing of stations would help.
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  #18  
Old 05-19-2018, 07:32 AM
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Ch 65 Milwaukee used to rebroadcast Ch 26 Chicago on the cheap by merely picking up Chicago signal (82 miles) with a yagi on old radio tower atop Marc Plaza Bldg (now Hilton Hotel)(where CH 65 transmitter was located.)

They avoided paying for a link or satellite transponder.

Picture quality ranged from acceptable to a bit noisy on some days.

So this is an example of "reliable" UHF reception over 80 miles, albeit from high-building-to-high-building.
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  #19  
Old 05-21-2018, 09:43 PM
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WBOC Salisbury, MD used to get signals from the Baltimore stations via relay towers in between. I remember well into the 80's catching a glimpse of the WBAL station ID on WBOC-someone wasn't quick enough on the switch. I'm not sure how far that is as the crow flies (112 miles to drive it).
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  #20  
Old 02-25-2019, 08:58 PM
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Did all the networks carry the parade that year? Or was NBC the only one that broadcast in color. Wasn't the Rhinelander station on air, also? They were on either channel 12 or 13.
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  #21  
Old 02-26-2019, 09:01 AM
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What about Duluth? IIRC KDAL Ch3 went on in 1954.
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  #22  
Old 02-26-2019, 01:11 PM
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What about Duluth? IIRC KDAL Ch3 went on in 1954.
Duluth may have been impossible. 405 kilometers, 251 miles, as the crow flies between Duluth and Escanaba. Not to mention the Porcupine Mountains being right in the middle of them.

I recently read a paper by a member of the American Geophysical Union that suggests that the presence of mafic and ultramafic minerals in bedrock can tremendously alter the ground plane as "seen" by a transmitting or receiving antenna. It actually explains a lot of my own experiences given how common BIFs are in the western Upper Peninsula, and how much of the far western UP is essentially a huge basalt and gabbro escarpment.

Radio and TV reception is great in the more felsic eastern UP. As you head west though, TV and radio reception begins to suffer, despite the rugged terrain not being substantially different in terms of height above average terrain than the east.

The Keweenaw is probably the most striking example of this phenomenon IMO. In Copper Harbor, you can not receive the TV station in Calumet, 40-50 miles away tops. FM reception in Copper Harbor also peters away to nothing.

None of this would alter reception in Escanaba appreciably, but it helps explain why reception of Marquette stations can be spotty even relatively close in Escanaba.

Last edited by benman94; 02-26-2019 at 03:19 PM. Reason: I'm an idiot and don't seem to know the difference between a kilometer and mile.
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  #23  
Old 02-26-2019, 02:15 PM
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Duluth would have been impossible. 405 miles as the crow flies between Duluth and Escanaba.
That must be a drunken crow! Closer to 250 miles I think.


.
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  #24  
Old 02-26-2019, 03:17 PM
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That must be a drunken crow! Closer to 250 miles I think.


.
You're right of course. Damned Imperial units...

405 kilometers, 251 miles. I wish we'd go metric already.

Last edited by benman94; 02-26-2019 at 03:25 PM.
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  #25  
Old 02-27-2019, 11:24 AM
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That must be a drunken crow! Closer to 250 miles I think.


.
A lonnnng haul any way you look at it
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  #26  
Old 02-27-2019, 12:29 PM
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Escanaba was/is a Mill Town- Mead Paper Co., & as such, at least SOME of the residents were rather well paid. Back in my former life as a Purchasing Agent for a printing concern, I sweated bullets-especially during the winter months, waiting on trucks from Escanaba.. TV DXing was/is still possible, at least up until they turned off NTSC... I used to go up on top of this local tall hill, w/a JVC 4.5" color set, & could easily receive stations from all over the Southeast... I got all the local network feeds, a BUNCH of independents, & a few that I never really worried about trying to identify. One night me & a buddy were up there, & there were a bunch of strange lights on top of this mountain range that was over in the Smokies. The fact we were up on top of a mountain in winter, watching TV, you ask ? Hey, it was simply "Something To Do", just to get outta the house for at least a little while. We stopped at the Police Station & reported our strange encounter, & got THEM a bit concerned. Next day, one of the cops got back to me, & said it was the "DEW" line we saw-the Air Force must have been doing a bit of night training. Yeah, we got Bongo-52s over head on a regular basis back in the 60s, when I was a tadpole. Oncet one was so low, & was banked enuf to where I could see the co-pilot... I dutifully waved, & I THINK he waved back...
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  #27  
Old 02-27-2019, 03:14 PM
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Escanaba was/is a Mill Town- Mead Paper Co., & as such, at least SOME of the residents were rather well paid. Back in my former life as a Purchasing Agent for a printing concern, I sweated bullets-especially during the winter months, waiting on trucks from Escanaba.....
The Upper Peninsula has historically relied on three industries: copper and iron mining, lumber and paper products, and tourism. I guess if you go back far enough one could make the argument that fur trading was the fourth major industry.

It would be a very pleasant place to live though. I check for openings in my field in Marquette and Houghton/Hancock once a week. I'd love nothing more than to get out of South-East Michigan and head up north.
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  #28  
Old 02-27-2019, 04:35 PM
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My buddy & I were both "Major-League" fans of "Hill Street Blues", & "St Elsewhere", & both lusted mightily over Veronica Hamel & Cindy Pickett, amongst others. The only fly in the ointment was I kinda thought "Joyce Davenport" was a bit on the "Too Bitchy" side, she could have been a LOT sweeter to the "Frank Furillo" character. But it WAS kinda neat watching that show from a station way the hell off in Norton, Virginia, or somewhere like that. Like I said, shit, it was SOMETHIN' to do-better than sitting at home. The old guy who owned the theater in town was a radio repair guy, & after the War, bought the 1st TV here in Bugtussle. THAT was a Big Deal, so much so that he built a set of bleachers up there, had power, rigged up an antenna, & at night during the warm months, they'd gather up there, & try to coax out a signal from WRB or WAGA outta Atlanta. My Uncle went up there a few times, he said every so often, they'd get a pic of a baseball diamond, & maybe an announcer, & the whole bunch would cheer & holler... We didn't get a local station til 1953, or '54, & I think it was outta Knoxville.. Hey, life in Small Town America after the War... Gotta LOVE it ! I have that TV-a 1948-49 7" Bakelite cased Admiral, & I had it "Gone thru", it works pretty well, especially for what it is... They weren't exactly very sophisticated machines.
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Last edited by Sandy G; 02-27-2019 at 04:39 PM.
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  #29  
Old 02-27-2019, 08:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benman94 View Post
The Upper Peninsula has historically relied on three industries: copper and iron mining, lumber and paper products, and tourism. I guess if you go back far enough one could make the argument that fur trading was the fourth major industry.

It would be a very pleasant place to live though. I check for openings in my field in Marquette and Houghton/Hancock once a week. I'd love nothing more than to get out of South-East Michigan and head up north.
Be careful what you wish for. As of the other day, Marquette was at 200" of snow & counting. Good 'ol lake effect.
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  #30  
Old 02-28-2019, 06:38 AM
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Be careful what you wish for. As of the other day, Marquette was at 200" of snow & counting. Good 'ol lake effect.
Meh. I'd rather deal with the snow and have cooler summers. Winter weather doesn't bother me, any kind of heat does.
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