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  #61  
Old 12-18-2017, 11:06 PM
Titan1a Titan1a is offline
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Meanwhile my "valve" components continue to operate without any possibility of EMP damage. Most of my 'puters are Faraday shielded and unplugged.
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  #62  
Old 12-19-2017, 01:13 AM
centralradio centralradio is offline
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There's a B in numbnuts!
Sorry.Typo.Numbnuts.Blame the eggnog.LOL..............
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  #63  
Old 12-19-2017, 01:21 AM
centralradio centralradio is offline
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Originally Posted by Electronic M View Post
Unlikely to ever happen. Most boxes are Linux based, Linux is hard to write viruses for and the cable companies are a secretive cabal of encryption and proprietary equipment fetishists....A virus would just about have to be an inside job.
Thats good news they are using Linux.They be doomed if they were using Windows.

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Originally Posted by Jeffhs View Post
The chances of HDTVs, set-top boxes, DTV converter boxes, etc. being irreparably damaged or even destroyed by nuclear events and so on are extremely slim. As was mentioned, most STBs, DTV converters, and even HD televisions themselves are powered by Linux, which, again as mentioned, is all but impervious to viruses. When new software is installed on a Linux-based computer, the system always asks for the user's password before initiating the software download; these systems do not allow anything to be downloaded without a password, so, again, the chances of malicious software (malware) being downloaded to a Linux-based system are slim to nonexsistent. This system was incorporated into Linux for just that reason: to prevent rogue software from being downloaded and installed. A recent episode of the NBC-TV series "Chicago Med", in which the hospital's entire computer system was shut down by a rogue virus, was probably based on just such a worst case scenario, and may well have been where VK member Centralradio got the idea for his comments.
Never seen the show.Chicago Med.Not into current TV shows.Just thinking ahead what could happen with anything that is digital.It does not take too much to screw it up.Just dont trust it.
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  #64  
Old 12-19-2017, 01:31 AM
WISCOJIM WISCOJIM is offline
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Originally Posted by Jeffhs View Post
A recent episode of the NBC-TV series "Chicago Med", in which the hospital's entire computer system was shut down by a rogue virus, was probably based on just such a worst case scenario, and may well have been where VK member Centralradio got the idea for his comments.
The plot of that episode was dealing with ransomware, which is very real and has created serious havoc already. Not just a TV story, this stuff is real life.

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  #65  
Old 12-19-2017, 12:55 PM
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Jeffhs Jeffhs is offline
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Originally Posted by andy View Post
Streaming devices like Roku and Apple TV have even shorter lives than broadcast standards. After a few years, they start dropping compatibility with older models. They either don't issue needed software updates, or certain services require more computing power than the older models have.
How many years do these players usually last before the software becomes obsolete and/or the processor becomes too slow to keep up with current standards? I upgraded to Roku 2 from Roku 1 about a year or so ago. Both players are still working very well (I tried my Roku 1 with my 22-year-old Zenith Sentry 2 TV the other day, and it still works great), although my Roku 1 is very slow compared to the newer one. If push comes to shove and I must get a new Roku next year, I will (I might upgrade even sooner, as the Roku Streaming Stick is even cheaper than what I paid for my Roku 2), but it seems I will be stuck in an endless cycle of updates--in another year or two, the Roku Streaming Stick will be rendered obsolete and I'll have to buy a new one (even though the old one may still be working perfectly well, if slowly), the player will work a couple more years, and then...here we go again.

Oh well. As I stated earlier, the Roku Streaming Stick will cost me even less than a cable subscription (I don't have cable any longer, but must at least have a cable account so the Spectrum/former Time Warner Cable TV app will receive local TV stations), and I may not have to upgrade again for at least a couple of years, or whenever Roku declares the Streaming Stick obsolete (however, they probably will have a newer version of the stick available by then, so the chances are I will probably have nothing to worry about). If I didn't have a DVD player, I'd upgrade to the Roku version that has a universal TV remote, but that remote presently won't operate auxiliary devices such as DVDs; besides, I already have an RCA universal remote that has operated my entire video system, including the Roku, flawlessly for the last couple of years, so having a universal Roku remote would be redundant, to say the least.

One nice thing about the Roku players, IMO, is the basic ones won't empty your wallet and so can be replaced with newer ones at minimal cost, although the more advanced ones go for over $100. I think a lot of Roku owners who have version 4 and up won't be too happy with having to spend another $100+ when the units eventually go out of date.

Well, that's the way it goes, I guess.
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  #66  
Old 12-19-2017, 06:32 PM
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Jon A. Jon A. is offline
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Originally Posted by Jeffhs View Post
How many years do these players usually last before the software becomes obsolete and/or the processor becomes too slow to keep up with current standards?
I was thinking how it's the same thing with modern computers, after about a decade using them to ride the information superhighway is like driving a car with a plugged cat. Of course the software upgrades cost more than the computers which is one reason I'd prefer to do most other things on a pre-candyland Power Mac given the choice.
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  #67  
Old 12-19-2017, 08:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Jeffhs View Post
How many years do these players usually last before the software becomes obsolete and/or the processor becomes too slow to keep up with current standards? ....
While, the Roku 1 still works, it has limited compatibility. For example, HBO no longer works on the Roku 1. I'n not sure which other services stopped working.

My Tivo series 3 still works fine as a DVR, but it has lost most of the streaming services, it can no longer be programmed via their web site, or app, and Tivo won't let new customers activate them.
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  #68  
Old 04-10-2018, 06:17 PM
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etype2 etype2 is offline
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KFPH’s UNIMAS NOW BROADCASTING ATSC 3.0 IN PHOENIX.

The first to step up to the plate, in what is known as the Phoenix Model Market, is KFPH-CD Channel 35, a local Univision-owned station, in Phoenix, now airing UniMás network programming in ATSC 3.0. Pearl TV Managing Director Anne Schelle made the announcement at the NAB show currently running in Las Vegas.

PBS kids channel 8.4 in Phoenix will be next and currently setting up. Just learned of this today. I can confirm the channel is on the air, but my HD flat panel can’t show it. My recently installed Sony 4K projector is capable of displaying OTA ATSC 3.0 to the best of my knowledge, but I have to install a splitter at the wall to send the rooftop antenna signal. The projector is currently hooked up to display DirecTV and 4K Blu Ray. Will show a screenshot after hook up.

Edit: I have two HDMI inputs on the projector. Looks like I will need a 75 Ohm to HDMI adaptor. I’ve already installed a 75 ohm coax outlet near the projector and the four TV consoles in the back of the room. I’m hoping this will work. If not, we may have to wait for a “black box” adaptor/receiver.
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Last edited by etype2; 04-10-2018 at 06:51 PM.
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  #69  
Old 04-10-2018, 11:41 PM
Chip Chester Chip Chester is offline
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I'm at the NAB convention in Vegas now. 8K displays are everywhere, and are similar in fidelity to looking out an open window... ATSC 3.0 monetization schemes are rampant. Buzzwords include "one encoder per person", as in custom streams to and from everyone on demand. Stock your pantries. Hide your livestock. Bedlam is nigh.
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