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  #16  
Old 10-09-2017, 08:30 AM
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Electronic M Electronic M is offline
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They wouldn't be the first studios to hate the chosen broadcast format and transcode the studio's chosen format to it....Here in the states when CBS's field sequential system lost the format war officially (writing was on the wall long before), CBS took their existing field sequential broadcast studio ran it through a transcoder, and were the first post NTSC approval station broadcasting NTSC!...They continued with that kludge for years until the field sequential gear broke or they had got over their loss enough to stomach buying proper NTSC color cameras.
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Old 10-09-2017, 09:39 AM
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Heard that the advantage of SECAM was that the viewer couldn't mess it up - on NTSC they could get the hue & saturation wrong, on PAL in the UK the saturation was often to high, but on SECAM the broadcaster was in charge & the viewer got what they got & that was that. That's on TV's without a colour/saturation control that IIRC original SECAM sets didn't have, the later PAL/SECAM sets did have a colour/saturation control so the viewer could mess it up. I had a PAL/SECAM/NTSC TV & that had a hue & saturation control...
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Old 10-15-2017, 03:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Electronic M View Post
CBS's field sequential system lost the format war...CBS took their existing field sequential broadcast studio ran it through a transcoder, and were the first post NTSC approval station broadcasting NTSC!...They continued with that kludge for years until the field sequential gear broke or they had got over their loss enough to stomach buying proper NTSC color cameras.
You're thinking of the Chromacoder, a Rube Goldberg use of sequential color field cameras to broadcast NTSC. I am quite sure network use of the Chromacorder didn't last much beyond 1954. In fact, CBS in Hollywood was equipped with TK-41s by the fall of that year. I'm not sure if any definitive evidence exists as to exactly how long that technique was used, but probably not outside the very early, still experimental period following the approval of NTSC color. It required a ton more light and (surprise, surprise), gave an inferior result compared to an all-electronic color camera.
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Old 10-15-2017, 01:18 PM
Colly0410 Colly0410 is offline
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BBC1 on low band reached over 99% of the UK population by the 60's, it also reached large parts of the Irish Republic, Northern France, Western Belgium & Western Netherlands. They made TV's that'd work on 405, 625 & 819 lines for use in Northern France & Belgium, they must have been very expensive...
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Old 10-15-2017, 07:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Electronic M View Post
They wouldn't be the first studios to hate the chosen broadcast format and transcode the studio's chosen format to it....Here in the states when CBS's field sequential system lost the format war officially (writing was on the wall long before), CBS took their existing field sequential broadcast studio ran it through a transcoder, and were the first post NTSC approval station broadcasting NTSC!...They continued with that kludge for years until the field sequential gear broke or they had got over their loss enough to stomach buying proper NTSC color cameras.
The Chromacoder cameras used the field sequential method, but that was about it. Chromacoder =/= CBS field sequential. They scanned 525 lines at 180 fields per second, 60 of them red, 60 of them blue, 60 of them green. The raster was rotated 90 degrees so the scan lines would run vertically so as to reduce the moire patters when converting the result to NTSC. The output from the camera was then fed in a round robin fashion to one of three special CRTs operating at 27ish kV with a specially formulated P1 phosphor, one tube for red, one for green, and one for blue. Each CRT had a camera tube aimed at it, and the output of the three camera tubes was used, along with a storage tube, to develop an NTSC signal.
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