Videokarma.org

Go Back   Videokarma.org TV - Video - Vintage Television & Radio Forums > Solid State CRT Televisions

We appreciate your help

in keeping this site going.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 11-22-2017, 09:13 PM
Beachboy Beachboy is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Northeast Kansas
Posts: 108
My dad was too cheap (frugal) to even buy a TV and grandma took pity on us after JFK's death in 1963 (and we were unable to watch the funeral proceedings), and bought us a Zenith 18" BW TV. I kept that set alive until 1974, when I finally "gave up" and told dad he was on his own. He splurged and bought a 25" Magnavox solid state console model, and I took the broken Zenith back to college with me, where I found a reasonably-priced TV shop that fixed it. Kept that old Zenith until '78 when I moved. One reason we didn't get color TV earlier was that we lived in a marginal signal area, and legend had it that color wouldn't "work" unless you had a pristine signal. The Magnavox worked fine on our attic antenna and lasted until the early 90's.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-23-2017, 11:06 AM
Colly0410 Colly0410 is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Hucknall, Nottingham, England.
Posts: 105
Interesting thread... Here in England it'd be the early/mid 1970's when colour TV's started to become popular, a lot were rented, some with a 50 pence coin meter on the back or side. My parents bought a Sony 18 inches colour set in 72 or 73, they got a free Elizabetan T12 B/W TV free. (I've still got it) The Sony cost just over 200 pounds, you can buy a new flat screen TV from Aldi for 179 pounds (about 210 dollars) today. Last time I saw a B/W as someones main TV would be early 80's. A thing putting a lot of people off colour TV was the more expensive colour TV licence, it was (still is) about 3 times the cost of a B/W one...
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-23-2017, 12:04 PM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 5,799
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colly0410 View Post
Interesting thread... Here in England it'd be the early/mid 1970's when colour TV's started to become popular, a lot were rented, some with a 50 pence coin meter on the back or side. My parents bought a Sony 18 inches colour set in 72 or 73, they got a free Elizabetan T12 B/W TV free. (I've still got it) The Sony cost just over 200 pounds, you can buy a new flat screen TV from Aldi for 179 pounds (about 210 dollars) today. Last time I saw a B/W as someones main TV would be early 80's. A thing putting a lot of people off colour TV was the more expensive colour TV licence, it was (still is) about 3 times the cost of a B/W one...
Is the color licence only for one set, as many people have more than one TV.
I know, the TV licence subsidizes BBC programing.
Some people might disagree with me but the BBC has some excellent programing. PBS shows much of their best.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11-23-2017, 12:50 PM
Celt's Avatar
Celt Celt is offline
Super Maude
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Paragould, Arkansas
Posts: 1,546
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavGoodlin View Post
Most of the Sony buyers were the more affluent folks, who specifically bought small-screen color for "the den" never the living room, as they were way too high-brow for thier TV to be so obvious.
LOL! Friends of mine had a 19" Sony....they thought 25" consoles were tacky and vulgar.
__________________

Let me live in the house beside the road and be a friend to man.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11-23-2017, 02:12 PM
maxhifi's Avatar
maxhifi maxhifi is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 1,347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Celt View Post
LOL! Friends of mine had a 19" Sony....they thought 25" consoles were tacky and vulgar.

I grew up exactly like that, ours was a 20" Sony, first in the den, then the basement. I still feel like there's something a little wrong about the Panasonic plasma in my living room!
Reply With Quote
Audiokarma
  #21  
Old 11-23-2017, 04:32 PM
Jon A.'s Avatar
Jon A. Jon A. is offline
Bullies beware.
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 3,979
The Sony consoles are heavy buggers too, anyone collecting those should try to get hold of an engine hoist, especially if they get hold of a KV-3000.

The Freelings were up to their necks in Sony sets, and even their neighbors had one. Their respective living room sets also had the most unique ability to be able to respond to Zenith Space Command 600Z clickers.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 11-24-2017, 12:22 AM
dishdude's Avatar
dishdude dishdude is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 437
I guess we were trashy, we had a GE console in the living room!
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 11-24-2017, 12:49 AM
ChrisW6ATV's Avatar
ChrisW6ATV ChrisW6ATV is offline
Another CT-100 lives!
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Hayward, Cal. USA
Posts: 3,310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Telecolor 3007 View Post
Why even in 1976-1982 color tv were still expensive for people from USA?
I've read (even around here) that some people could only afford a color set only after 1976, and some get one only in 1978-1982 + a 2nd color set was expensive for a lot of people. Where price so big? Did it count that most people from U.S.A. had to invest in car so there where less money left for an tv set?
There are probably many different answers to your question.

1) From 1973 to 1982, there were many changes in the economy in the USA, and many homes/families did not have extra money to choose color TV after they paid for food, rent, and other expenses. (Yes, many times a car was needed, but many families such as mine did not have a car, either.)

2) Even in the 1970s, color TV sets often needed repairs more often than most other home possessions, or people believed that they needed repairs often, so many people kept their black-and-white sets because of fear of repair costs. This fear would stop many people from buying a used color TV and instead buy a new B&W TV set again.

3) This comment is valid also:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Celt View Post
LOL! Friends of mine had a 19" Sony....they thought 25" consoles were tacky and vulgar.
Even portable color TV sets were "big" compared to black-and-white sets with the same size screen, so a color TV would be more conspicuous and many people did not like that.

In my family, we never had a color TV set together, but my mother and her sister's family joined money and bought a new Hitachi 19-inch color set for my grandmother (their mother) in 1974 for US$420. My brother bought a 19-inch Sony in 1977 when he was 20 years old for US$490, then I bought my own 19-inch Sony in 1979 when I was 19 years old, for US$450.
__________________
Chris

Quote from another forum: "(Antique TV collecting) always seemed to me to be a fringe hobby that only weirdos did."
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 11-25-2017, 09:36 AM
Colly0410 Colly0410 is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Hucknall, Nottingham, England.
Posts: 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieseljeep View Post
Is the color licence only for one set, as many people have more than one TV.
I know, the TV licence subsidizes BBC programing.
Some people might disagree with me but the BBC has some excellent programing. PBS shows much of their best.
The TV licence covers a house/apt & you can have as many TV's as you want, we have 5 TV's = 3 colour & 2 B/W, one from 1972. You need a licence to watch or record any live TV & watch BBC i-player catch up service. You can watch ITV, channel's 4 & 5 catch up services & you tube/online films with no licence though..
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 11-27-2017, 12:39 PM
DavGoodlin's Avatar
DavGoodlin DavGoodlin is offline
Motorola Minion
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: near Strasburg PA
Posts: 2,714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colly0410 View Post
The TV licence covers a house/apt & you can have as many TV's as you want, we have 5 TV's = 3 colour & 2 B/W, one from 1972. You need a licence to watch or record any live TV & watch BBC i-player catch up service. You can watch ITV, channel's 4 & 5 catch up services & you tube/online films with no licence though..
I recall a visit to Great Britain in the late 70's, maybe there were only BB1,2 and ITV. The UHF Yagi antenna mountings varied with the odd chimneys and building structures yet were all pretty consistent. The different bands of UHF had their own specific antenna but all looked similar.

I was given by this one innkeeper an indoor, set top UHF antenna "Labgear", zig-zag helical with a 72 ohm push-on connector. It works as good as any other non-amplified indoor UHF I've tried, even with ATSC.
__________________
"When resistors increase in value, they're worthless"
-Dave G

Last edited by DavGoodlin; 11-27-2017 at 12:42 PM.
Reply With Quote
Audiokarma
  #26  
Old 11-29-2017, 10:26 AM
Colly0410 Colly0410 is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Hucknall, Nottingham, England.
Posts: 105
Yes the 1970's/80's UHF antennas all seemed to look the same, some were a bit longer in the few weak signal areas. When digital terrestrial TV fired up in the late 1990's/2000's the sales people would tell buyers their old antennas would no longer work & millions of people bought new ones. (including my in-laws, I was annoyed when I found out they'd paid 225 pounds for a new so called digital antenna) & now there are lots of antennas with 4 to 6 reflectors, a dipole & up to 10 X shaped directors. My old loft antenna works perfect on digital TV but the digital sales lady tried her best to get me to have a new antenna.

In 1982 a new channel called channel 4 fired up, although it didn't transmit on VHF channel 4, (BBC1 was on there till 1985) in my area it was confusingly on channels UHF 31 & 54. In 1997 channel 5 fired up, that was on UHF 37 from 2 distant TX's that interfered with each other, a year later it fired up on the local TX's on 34 & 35. We thought it was great to have 5 channels after so long with only 3. Now we have about 50 odd on digital freeview...
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 12-03-2017, 11:48 PM
colorfixer's Avatar
colorfixer colorfixer is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon A. View Post
The Sony consoles are heavy buggers too, anyone collecting those should try to get hold of an engine hoist, especially if they get hold of a KV-3000.

The Freelings were up to their necks in Sony sets, and even their neighbors had one. Their respective living room sets also had the most unique ability to be able to respond to Zenith Space Command 600Z clickers.
IMHO:
The Freelings were subject to creative product placement with Sony and the producers. ET also was the subject of creative product placement with Reese, Atari, Texas Instruments, and Kuwahara (bikes).
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 12-04-2017, 04:20 AM
Jon A.'s Avatar
Jon A. Jon A. is offline
Bullies beware.
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 3,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by colorfixer View Post
IMHO:
The Freelings were subject to creative product placement with Sony and the producers.
Natch, and even a Sony U-Matic was brought in to record the paranormal activity.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:45 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
ęCopyright 2012 VideoKarma.org, All rights reserved.