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  #1  
Old 07-06-2016, 07:02 PM
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duodiode duodiode is offline
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Sanyo 14-H1 info wanted

Hello. I accidentally originally posted this request in the "Introductions" section, it being my first post and not being familiar with the way Videokarma works, so I thought I'd post here as well.
I'm after any information on this set. It is a mid to late '50s set, using a 14RP4A CRT and a series string heater chain. It seems to have been made in Japan for the Australian market, as there is a Sanyo branded 240 to 100 V step down transformer attached to the inside of the cabinet. Interestingly, the serial number on the chassis is 000001!
Any info, especially a circuit diagram, would be much appreciated.

Cheers.
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File Type: jpg Sanyo 14-H1 a.jpg (85.6 KB, 48 views)
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  #2  
Old 07-06-2016, 08:04 PM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duodiode View Post
Hello. I accidentally originally posted this request in the "Introductions" section, it being my first post and not being familiar with the way Videokarma works, so I thought I'd post here as well.
I'm after any information on this set. It is a mid to late '50s set, using a 14RP4A CRT and a series string heater chain. It seems to have been made in Japan for the Australian market, as there is a Sanyo branded 240 to 100 V step down transformer attached to the inside of the cabinet. Interestingly, the serial number on the chassis is 000001!
Any info, especially a circuit diagram, would be much appreciated.

Cheers.
The 14RP4 was a common 90 degree CRT used in many brands of US portable TV's.
I don't remember anything built by Sanyo until the mid 60's, most were private labeled. That would be transistor radios with the Magnavox or Channel Master branding, a decent product.
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Old 07-06-2016, 11:18 PM
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I haven't seen an imported set that old anywhere here (I'm also in Australia). I've seen some later Japanese series string sets with factory fitted 240V to 100V stepdown transformers, but never anything this early. With a serial number of 00001 I wonder if you have a sample set that was brought in for evaluation. Perhaps the only one. Considering the high tariffs on imported electronics at the time they may have found it wasn't viable.

You have a very rare set there. Do have more pictures?
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Old 07-07-2016, 06:15 PM
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Yes, I wondered myself if it was brought in for evaluation, and is possibly the only one. The specification sheet though seems to show I.F. frequencies as would have been used in Japan, with 4.5 MHz audio intercarrier. I am currently working on the set and hope to have it up and running soon, so I can determine the I.F. frequencies actually used. The CRT tests in the good range but drops to bad when the "life test" button pushed (B&K 467). Photos to follow, when I get time.
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  #5  
Old 07-25-2016, 09:57 AM
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Hi to Australia,

Do you have the rest of it? Knobs are often missing.
I am a kind of expert, have a fine collection of early 50s japanese
TV sets, literature and schematics.
I may help you out with a schematic, will take a look.
I have a 1957/58 Sanyo, which looks more oldfashon than yours, these sets were
never officially exported.
Your set is from about 1960 or younger.
For political reasons the 14" tubes were common up to the early 60s, and they
were standard, other diameters are rare.
Sanyos of the 50s are rare, never saw another one than mine in Japan in 7 years.
Maybe your set was owned by an embassy member or so.

There are a lot of people moving and don`t realize, that just the TV
is closeby worthless in there new homeland.
I have a couple of these homeless TVs from around the world.

Best regards,
TV-collector
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Last edited by TV-collector; 07-25-2016 at 03:34 PM.
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  #6  
Old 07-25-2016, 11:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TV-collector View Post
For political reasons the 14" tubes were common up to the early 60s, and they were Standard, other diameters are rare.
Did the Japanese not make almost any non-14" for themselves or export, and why?
Could you please explain that better?
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Old 07-25-2016, 03:28 PM
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Hi Tom in Australia,

The main problem was that the price of a TV was given by the diameter
of the CRT, this is based on Tenno`s politics.
The price for a TV was unbelievable high in the early 50s!
A well-educated man who had a government job had to work several years,
without eating- and living-costs to save the money for a TV.
The official start for television was 1953, with roundies, and 14" sets.
Top luxary sets had in the mid 50s 17" CRTs, mostly in consoles.
I have 2 Toshiba consoles and a 17" General table set.
Roundies had mostly 7", only few had a 10" tube. I have three 7" and two
10" sets.
I saw only one 21" set in about 7 years!
In the early 60s the 19" tubes were common, but the 14" screen was
standard of Japan.
Small transistor radios were interesting for international markets, but not the
oldfashion small screen TVs.
Japan was a closen country, for many centuries, still today, you feel it
if you (try to) deal with japanese people.

TV-collector
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Old 07-25-2016, 10:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TV-collector View Post
Hi Tom in Australia,
I'm not in OZ. I'm 20 min west of Milwaukee Wisconsin U.S.A (my location is in the top right of all my posts)....But all the same thanks for the info about early Japanese TV.
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Old 07-27-2016, 08:17 PM
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More photos of Sanyo 14-H1

Hello TV-collector. Yes, the TV is complete. I have re-capped it, re-wound the audio OP transformer, replaced some crook valves and have to set sort of working. It has excessive width but I'll ask about that in another thread. The set is definitely factory modified for Australian conditions. Sanyo did export TVs to Australia later, I have circuits for a couple of B&W solid state sets. Sanyo actually had some colour TVs manufactured in Australia, by a company called Guthrie, in the mid 1970s.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Sanyo 14-H1 first power up.jpg (62.7 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg Sanyo 14-H1 rear.jpg (97.7 KB, 16 views)
File Type: jpg Sanyo 14-H1 rear2.jpg (104.0 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg Sanyo 14-H1 ID plate.jpg (56.2 KB, 14 views)
File Type: jpg 14-H1 ch und enhanced B&W.jpg (150.9 KB, 19 views)
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  #10  
Old 07-27-2016, 08:21 PM
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With a serial that low it's probably a prototype.
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  #11  
Old 07-27-2016, 08:41 PM
dieseljeep dieseljeep is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duodiode View Post
Hello TV-collector. Yes, the TV is complete. I have re-capped it, re-wound the audio OP transformer, replaced some crook valves and have to set sort of working. It has excessive width but I'll ask about that in another thread. The set is definitely factory modified for Australian conditions. Sanyo did export TVs to Australia later, I have circuits for a couple of B&W solid state sets. Sanyo actually had some colour TVs manufactured in Australia, by a company called Guthrie, in the mid 1970s.
Admiral had a plant there as well! I think, there was a few other US firms, like Philco, that was there as well.
The system used there was CCIR, where the color was PAL. Correct me, if I'm wrong.
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Old 07-27-2016, 11:27 PM
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Yes, Admiral had a plant 1956 to 1961. Philco did not have a plant, but Philco branded radios were made by a local company Emmco, later Email, from 1936 to about 1954. There were no Philco branded TVs sold in Australia as far as I know. Motorola, GE Raytheon brands were also used on TVs made in Australia by Australian firms which had some technical assistance from those USA companies. The brands were often used in conjunction with the Australian brands: Ferris-Raytheon and Pope-Motorola for instance.
Astor, AWA, HMV, Kriesler, Philips and Pye were the big TV brands manufactured here. Three of those had close connections with the big overseas concerns of the same name.
Yes, CCIR B and PAL.
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Old 07-28-2016, 06:22 AM
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Thanks for the pics. While I've seen later Japanese made sets (and 1 radiogram, funnily enough I think it was also a Sanyo) with factory fitted internal 240V to 100V transformers those were all hard wired. I've never seen one where the original line cord plugged into the transformer.

I've got a little Kirby-GE B&W portable I found recently. It has USA made GE valves in it (I don't think anyone made compactrons here), but all the other components appear to be Australian made. These were sold with an external step down transformer (no room to mount it inside) and optionally a 12V to 115V inverter. I've seen a few of the GE branded step down transformers (usually powering other imported gear long after the TV was gone), but I've never seen the inverter.
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