Videokarma.org

Go Back   Videokarma.org TV - Video - Vintage Television & Radio Forums > General Off Topic Forums

We appreciate your help

in keeping this site going.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-05-2017, 02:46 PM
Jeffhs's Avatar
Jeffhs Jeffhs is offline
<----Zenith C845
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Fairport Harbor, Ohio (near Lake Erie)
Posts: 3,480
Youtube video download forbidden by Chromium browser

I recently downloaded and now use the Google Chromium web browser, after having used Firefox for many years. However, one thing I noticed with Chromium is I can no longer download videos from Youtube as I was able to with FF. I get an error message (with the frowning TV screen and a suggestion to download the video in question from another site, not an "Aw, snap!" message as Chromium will issue if an attempt is made to log on to a nonexistent or broken website) stating that Chromium, in effect, is forbidden to download videos from YT due, no doubt, to copyright and DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) restrictions. However, I am still able to download Youtube video from Firefox, so I reinstalled that browser for the express purpose of YT downloading. Seems to work well, with no restrictions.

I'm baffled as to why on earth Chromium is forbidden to download Youtube video, while such is and has been legally possible for years with FF unless, as I said, it has something to do with copyright and/or DMCA issues. If video piracy is such a huge problem these days, I would think every Internet browser in current use, with no exceptions, would be blocked from being able to download video. In other words, if such downloading is forbidden by Chromium, why is FF allowed to have such extensions?
__________________
Jeff, WB8NHV

Collecting, restoring and enjoying vintage Zenith radios since 2002

Zenith. Gone, but not forgotten.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-05-2017, 03:24 PM
Electronic M's Avatar
Electronic M Electronic M is offline
M is for Memory
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pewaukee/Delafield Wi
Posts: 8,928
Google owns both chrome and youtube. Google views youtube videos as 'Their' property and will not allow a browser that they made to download/steal their content/revenue from adds repeat viewing something....

There are (or were, it has been a long time since I seriously investigated switching to chrome) experimental/developer addons for chrome that bypass the video thing, but will give you warnings to disable them every time you open chrome.
__________________
Tom C.

What I want. --> http://www.videokarma.org/showpost.p...62&postcount=4

Reading between the scan lines since the mid 2000's.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-05-2017, 03:30 PM
centralradio centralradio is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 963
Get Jdownloader .It will download from Chromium by copying the YT URL link in the address bar on top and the video will be download via Jdownloader.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-05-2017, 07:26 PM
Findm-Keepm's Avatar
Findm-Keepm Findm-Keepm is offline
Followin' the Rules...
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,835
Chrome=Google Browser
https://www.google.com/chrome/browse...top/index.html


Chromium=Open Source Browser, popular with Linux users. Not owned or supported by Google.

https://www.chromium.org/Home

Chrome is indeed a product Google, and there are a number of extensions that allow the D/L of some video content.
__________________
Brian
USN RET (Avionics / Cal)
CET- Consumer Repair and Avionics ('88)
"Capacitor Cosmetologist since '79"

When fuses go to work, they quit!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-06-2017, 09:07 PM
Jeffhs's Avatar
Jeffhs Jeffhs is offline
<----Zenith C845
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Fairport Harbor, Ohio (near Lake Erie)
Posts: 3,480
That explains a lot. Until now, I was not aware that Google indeed owns Chrome and Youtube, and as such considers YT videos as their exclusive property, taking a very dim view of anyone downloading them. (One learns something new every day.) However, as I mentioned in my last post, Mozilla's Firefox browser does not forbid such downloading, which is why I downloaded it on on my computer alongside Chrome and use the latter as my default browser. For what it is worth, I deleted Chromium from my system and installed Google Chrome, which seems to have corrected a small problem I was having with the former--namely, my version of Chromium would not automatically load thumbnails of often-visited web sites on the browser's start page. Chrome, however, downloads these thumbnails on the start page just as it should. I was glad of this because my bank's website is one I particularly wanted one-click access to.

BTW, I guess Google takes its intellectual property rights extremely seriously if it has designed Chrome and Chromium to block downloads of videos the former owns. I suppose Microsoft would be just as protective of videos it owns, if any (however, I am not aware at this time of any Microsoft-owned web video content).

Intellectual property protection is a very big deal these days; note that many if not most corporate logos, slogans, etc. shown in print ads and on TV, not to mention brand names on product labels, have an (R) symbol, albeit in very tiny type, after the last word. This means the entire logo, etc. is protected by copyright and, of course, may not be used by anyone else without express written permission of the owner.

There have always been laws against copyright infringement, but it seems, these days, most corporations, etc. are going out of their way, more than they previously did, to make absolutely certain no one steals their branding. Note as well that it is all but impossible in the digital age to copy, on videotape or DVD, television programs. We can thank the FCC and its Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) for that. I suppose, if one were in an area that still had analog cable TV, it would still be possible to videotape television programming; however, since cable TV in most major US cities is 100 percent digital (for example, Spectrum, formerly Time Warner Cable, recently converted its Northeast Ohio cable systems to this format, now requiring a cable box to receive anything at all), VCRs, which are analog devices, can no longer be used to record TV programming. However, they can still be used, of course, to play back previously recorded VHS tapes.

The same applies to DVD recorders, although I am sure the motion-picture and TV production industries would rather see all home recording, by any means, of TV programming banned. The public is now, in effect, being forced to purchase the DVD version(s) of any and all older TV shows/movies and even current ones. Amazon sells box sets of TV series, and they seem to be doing a good amount of business at it. (I have purchased several such box sets of several of my favorite 1970s TV series, and will continue to do so since I can no longer record shows on my VCR.) This is probably about the only way we will be able to get copies of our favorite TV shows these days, thanks, again, to the DMCA. It is a law no one likes, but as I said, the TV and movie industries are doing everything they can to protect their products from illegal copying and exhibition. When TV stations used to sign off at the end of their broadcast day, they would make an announcement to the effect that their programming absolutely cannot be used for any purpose except home viewing; this still holds true today, although the law now covers a lot more than just real-time TV viewing.
__________________
Jeff, WB8NHV

Collecting, restoring and enjoying vintage Zenith radios since 2002

Zenith. Gone, but not forgotten.

Last edited by Jeffhs; 11-06-2017 at 09:41 PM.
Reply With Quote
Audiokarma
  #6  
Old 11-07-2017, 08:25 AM
WISCOJIM WISCOJIM is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Grand Chute, Wisconsin
Posts: 1,728
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffhs View Post
VCRs, which are analog devices, can no longer be used to record TV programming.
Sure they can. All anyone needs is an OTA signal and any old CECB.

.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-07-2017, 12:13 PM
centralradio centralradio is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 963
Quote:
Originally Posted by WISCOJIM View Post
Sure they can. All anyone needs is an OTA signal and any old CECB.

.
Ditto ...I still use my VCR every day.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-07-2017, 12:25 PM
centralradio centralradio is offline
VideoKarma Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 963
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffhs View Post
That explains a lot. Until now, I was not aware that Google indeed owns Chrome and Youtube, and as such considers YT videos as their exclusive property, taking a very dim view of anyone downloading them. (One learns something new every day.) However, as I mentioned in my last post, Mozilla's Firefox browser does not forbid such downloading, which is why I downloaded it on on my computer alongside Chrome and use the latter as my default browser. For what it is worth, I deleted Chromium from my system and installed Google Chrome, which seems to have corrected a small problem I was having with the former--namely, my version of Chromium would not automatically load thumbnails of often-visited web sites on the browser's start page. Chrome, however, downloads these thumbnails on the start page just as it should. I was glad of this because my bank's website is one I particularly wanted one-click access to.

BTW, I guess Google takes its intellectual property rights extremely seriously if it has designed Chrome and Chromium to block downloads of videos the former owns. I suppose Microsoft would be just as protective of videos it owns, if any (however, I am not aware at this time of any Microsoft-owned web video content).

Intellectual property protection is a very big deal these days; note that many if not most corporate logos, slogans, etc. shown in print ads and on TV, not to mention brand names on product labels, have an (R) symbol, albeit in very tiny type, after the last word. This means the entire logo, etc. is protected by copyright and, of course, may not be used by anyone else without express written permission of the owner.

There have always been laws against copyright infringement, but it seems, these days, most corporations, etc. are going out of their way, more than they previously did, to make absolutely certain no one steals their branding. Note as well that it is all but impossible in the digital age to copy, on videotape or DVD, television programs. We can thank the FCC and its Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) for that. I suppose, if one were in an area that still had analog cable TV, it would still be possible to videotape television programming; however, since cable TV in most major US cities is 100 percent digital (for example, Spectrum, formerly Time Warner Cable, recently converted its Northeast Ohio cable systems to this format, now requiring a cable box to receive anything at all), VCRs, which are analog devices, can no longer be used to record TV programming. However, they can still be used, of course, to play back previously recorded VHS tapes.

The same applies to DVD recorders, although I am sure the motion-picture and TV production industries would rather see all home recording, by any means, of TV programming banned. The public is now, in effect, being forced to purchase the DVD version(s) of any and all older TV shows/movies and even current ones. Amazon sells box sets of TV series, and they seem to be doing a good amount of business at it. (I have purchased several such box sets of several of my favorite 1970s TV series, and will continue to do so since I can no longer record shows on my VCR.) This is probably about the only way we will be able to get copies of our favorite TV shows these days, thanks, again, to the DMCA. It is a law no one likes, but as I said, the TV and movie industries are doing everything they can to protect their products from illegal copying and exhibition. When TV stations used to sign off at the end of their broadcast day, they would make an announcement to the effect that their programming absolutely cannot be used for any purpose except home viewing; this still holds true today, although the law now covers a lot more than just real-time TV viewing.
The 1980's Betamax case come to mind.Anyway there is plenty of clean free movie/TV show download sites out there .Known video sites like Youtube/Dailymotion/Vimeo has full shows and movies on it .They cant keep up to deleting them.Instead of worrying about their bottom line .Hollyweird should concentrate on cleaning it self up with their pedophile /drug issues and the current crap they are producing there.

Last edited by centralradio; 11-08-2017 at 08:19 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-10-2017, 05:17 PM
Dude111 Dude111 is offline
Analogue is Awesome
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 1,717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electronic M
Google owns both chrome and youtube. Google views youtube videos as 'Their' property and will not allow a browser that they made to download/steal their content/revenue from adds repeat viewing something....
I wonder if changing your UA woud work??
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:38 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
ęCopyright 2012 VideoKarma.org, All rights reserved.