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Dude111 01-08-2016 05:56 AM

I wasnt sure which base was best to put this on....

A VERY LONG PAGE but well worth reading if your into fixing,etc..........

http://web.archive.org/web/200104271...ch_safety.html

Sandy G 01-08-2016 10:54 AM

Thank you for posting this. We ALL know this stuff, but it still don't hurt to review it every so often.

dieseljeep 01-08-2016 12:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sandy G (Post 3153436)
Thank you for posting this. We ALL know this stuff, but it still don't hurt to review it every so often.

The article is a British entry. I guess, they are more safety minded then we are.
When I first started repairing radios, I used to buy Carbon-tet for cleaning tuners and control pots. You could buy it at any drug store. No one really knew how nasty, the stuff is. :thumbsdn:

Colly0410 01-08-2016 05:03 PM

I suppose that with all mains electricity being 240 volts in the UK you would get twice the shock than at 120 volts that is used in USA. I know that some USA things run on 240 volts using a split phase = 120v-0-120v, so if you get a shock from any mains wire to earth/ground the maximum shock is 120 volts. However in UK if you get a shock from any mains wire to earth/ground it's 240 volts. All electric sockets & lamp-holders carry 240 volts. All appliance plugs have at least a 13 amp fuse in them, low power appliances(radio's, TV's, cable box's, table lamps) have lower amperage fuses e.g. 3 amp..

N2IXK 01-08-2016 06:58 PM

A very nice summary. Thanks for posting it.

The part about mercury acting as a "getter" and being the reason for the silvering on the inside of tube bulbs is dead wrong, though. The getter deposits are barium based.

dieseljeep 01-08-2016 07:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Colly0410 (Post 3153458)
I suppose that with all mains electricity being 240 volts in the UK you would get twice the shock than at 120 volts that is used in USA. I know that some USA things run on 240 volts using a split phase = 120v-0-120v, so if you get a shock from any mains wire to earth/ground the maximum shock is 120 volts. However in UK if you get a shock from any mains wire to earth/ground it's 240 volts. All electric sockets & lamp-holders carry 240 volts. All appliance plugs have at least a 13 amp fuse in them, low power appliances(radio's, TV's, cable box's, table lamps) have lower amperage fuses e.g. 3 amp..

The National Electrical Code, NEC dictates that no voltage in a home or small business is more than 120 volts to ground/earth. All of the newer 3 phase installations, when required are 120/208 volt Y systems. :thmbsp:

Dude111 01-09-2016 12:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by N2IXK
A very nice summary. Thanks for posting it.

Quite welcome mate,always good to read up. EVEN IF YOUR QUITE SURE :)

Colly0410 01-10-2016 06:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dieseljeep (Post 3153488)
The National Electrical Code, NEC dictates that no voltage in a home or small business is more than 120 volts to ground/earth. :thmbsp:

That sounds much safer than our 240 volts to earth/ground. My house has a '30 mili-amp earth/ground leakage cutout' for the whole house, slightest earth/ground leakage & 'click' the electric goes off. I had one of those George Forman health grills & that was always tripping the electric, one day it blew up completely so was binned..

dieseljeep 01-10-2016 01:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Colly0410 (Post 3153582)
That sounds much safer than our 240 volts to earth/ground. My house has a '30 mili-amp earth/ground leakage cutout' for the whole house, slightest earth/ground leakage & 'click' the electric goes off. I had one of those George Forman health grills & that was always tripping the electric, one day it blew up completely so was binned..

In the US, we don't have a GFCI, that is for the entire house. Most of the time, it's located in the kitchen or bath receptacle. :thmbsp:

Olorin67 01-10-2016 01:55 PM

I get the impression that the Brits are more safety conscious about technology in general, maybe having 240V electric power is one of the reasons. I read somewhere that if you have a gas appliance, you have to get it inspected once a year or your gas gets shut-off also.

centralradio 01-12-2016 01:01 PM

Thanks for sharing.

The UL should rewrite the rules that all AC items should have a fuse inline including CFL,LED lighting,Wall warts ,Kitchen Appliances and the list can go on.

I'm tired seeing these fuseless crap devices killing people with fires .

It would not hurt on the DC devices too with the powerful batteries.

ppppenguin 01-13-2016 03:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Olorin67 (Post 3153610)
I get the impression that the Brits are more safety conscious about technology in general, maybe having 240V electric power is one of the reasons. I read somewhere that if you have a gas appliance, you have to get it inspected once a year or your gas gets shut-off also.

In the UK it's recommended to get gas appliances inspected annually but nothing happens if you don't. If you are a landlord and rent out accommodation then you must get gas appliances inspected annually by a Registered Gas Installer and supply a copy of the certificate to your tenant. But again nothing will happen unless the tenant complains to the authorities. Then you can face criminal penalities.

dieseljeep 01-13-2016 11:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by centralradio (Post 3153805)
Thanks for sharing.

The UL should rewrite the rules that all AC items should have a fuse inline including CFL,LED lighting,Wall warts ,Kitchen Appliances and the list can go on.

I'm tired seeing these fuseless crap devices killing people with fires .

It would not hurt on the DC devices too with the powerful batteries.

Most of the items cited, have had overtemp and overcurrent protection for several years, per U/L standards.
Most electrical fires are caused by misapplication of the items and most are items over ten years old.

dieseljeep 01-18-2016 12:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dieseljeep (Post 3153939)
Most of the items cited, have had overtemp and overcurrent protection for several years, per U/L standards.
Most electrical fires are caused by misapplication of the items and most are items over ten years old.

Answering my own entry: I pulled a few dumb stunts myself!
I have two fibre-optic Christmas trees, one has an AC motor driven color wheel and the other one doesn't. I grabbed the wrong, lower current wall-wart and used it on a higher current tree. Within a half hour the thermo-fuse did it's job, open primary. I found another at a thrift, for a buck. :thmbsp:

Telecolor 3007 01-22-2016 05:39 PM

You can find Beryllium oxide in home use tranzistor radios or that used only in big power stuff?


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