View Full Version : A-C Radio and TV color TV display, mid 60s


old_tv_nut
02-25-2017, 09:13 PM
Here's the change from round to rectangular, on view in the color TV showroom of A-C Radio and Television Co. of Red Bank, NJ, where "Color is our business."

Note the Zenith wall with rectangular screens on top and roundies on the bottom.

old_tv_nut
02-25-2017, 09:21 PM
Can anyone identify the exact model year?

MadMan
02-26-2017, 01:29 AM
Eeenope.

zenithfan1
02-26-2017, 05:54 AM
I think it's safe to say this photo was taken in 1967. That was also the very last year for the Zenith roundie. I have several 1967 sets like in this picture.

old_tv_nut
02-26-2017, 10:32 AM
I think it's safe to say this photo was taken in 1967. That was also the very last year for the Zenith roundie. I have several 1967 sets like in this picture.

I was guessing 1966, but 1967 makes sense.

damien191
03-06-2017, 11:49 PM
how many tv's showrooms were like electronics stores today with all of the tv's on? also how regular was it to have a tv or two on in the window of a store, wouldn't the sun wash the screen out at different times of day

old_tv_nut
03-07-2017, 12:06 AM
how many tv's showrooms were like electronics stores today with all of the tv's on? also how regular was it to have a tv or two on in the window of a store, wouldn't the sun wash the screen out at different times of day

The big chains did the "wall of TVs" all turned on, for a long time. Don't know about the smaller independents, would guess that it was less common to have everything running the smaller the store was. It was a tired joke that the wall of TVs would have every set showing a different color rendition.

An operating TV in the window was more of an early TV thing I think, into the 1950s, and mainly involving monochrome sets. There are press pictures of various momentous occasions drawing crowds to windows with TV sets.

By the time color came out, most people were familiar with TV (in monochrome) so a window display wouldn't be such a big draw, plus stores didn't want to degrade the color picture with stray light since a color set was a hard sell at first due to the price, and the degradation seemed much worse than in monochrome. Not only were the color sets dimmer, but I think people were less accepting of washed-out color than washed out contrast on a monochrome set. Another thing to note is that monochrome cameras were operated with the image orthicon exposed above the knee, giving only an approximate gray scale rendition of the scene, with edges enhanced but large areas often washed out compared to a photograph or movie. Color cameras had to be operated in the linear region and have contrast corrected precisely with a gamma correction circuit in order for the color not to shift wildly with scene content. This resulted in tonally correct but usually darker images than those from monochrome practice, making color programs more susceptible to washing out from ambient light on the receiver face.

old_tv_nut
03-07-2017, 12:10 AM
It's also worth mentioning that some of the first places people saw TV (and later color TV) was in bars, as they were some of the earliest adopters in order to show sportscasts for their customers.

damien191
03-07-2017, 12:15 AM
it seems like there would be a relatively high cost in having a "wall of tv's" that are prone to regular failures, especially when i imagine they were designs for 2-4 hours of use per day and they would be running upwards of 12 in a store environment

i guess back then people would have been much less inclined to buy the ""floor model"

old_tv_nut
03-07-2017, 12:21 AM
it seems like there would be a relatively high cost in having a "wall of tv's" that are prone to regular failures, especially when i imagine they were designs for 2-4 hours of use per day and they would be running upwards of 12 in a store environment

i guess back then people would have been much less inclined to buy the ""floor model"

You have to remember that these were fresh out of the box sets that had not seen 50 years of capacitor degradation or controls getting dirty, so the major failures would be vacuum tube wear-out, not a big deal for something that would be running for less than a year before being replaced by the new model.

damien191
03-07-2017, 12:27 AM
You have to remember that these were fresh out of the box sets that had not seen 50 years of capacitor degradation or controls getting dirty, so the major failures would be vacuum tube wear-out, not a big deal for something that would be running for less than a year before being replaced by the new model.

this does make sense, and it was probably like today where the best sets get put out and the more prone to fail sit in boxes lol

etype2
03-07-2017, 01:33 AM
I didn't have the mobility until about 1961 to go around and view color sets. We did however read newspaper advertisements and also see color sets in family members homes prior to this time. From that point forward, we viewed color sets in major department stores in Milwaukee, such as Gimbels, Boston Store and Schusters. I recall vividly sets from most of the major manufactures set up displaying the same program in prime time hours in dept. stores. Probably about a dozen models. We spent hours evaluating the colors from each set.

The smaller stores and mom and pop shops would turn on the color sets upon request, but for the most part, in small independent shops, the sets were off, and maybe only one set was hooked up to an antenna. I do recall color sets displayed in window store fronts, but they were off. In the small shops, often times rabbit ear antennas were used to display color, while the dept. stores with larger budgets had all the sets rumnning with distribution amplifiers.

https://visions4netjournal.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/img_3880.jpg

https://visions4netjournal.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/img_3877.jpg

Independent mom and pop store.

https://visions4netjournal.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/img_3879.jpg

EdKozk2
03-07-2017, 07:42 AM
Cool pictures Etype2, I used to work near Holton and North in Milwaukee.

DavGoodlin
03-07-2017, 01:28 PM
Great picture- Wayne

Just think, the Chicago-three Motorola-Admiral-Zenith in one store, in one of Northern Jersey's wealthier NYC suburbs. Emerson and Westinghouse were still making TV's in nearby factories. You already had 7 (!) VHF channels there too.

Etype - Your last photo shows two 19" mini-consoles from 1967, one a Zenith and the other an RCA CTC19 :) awesome!

bgadow
03-07-2017, 10:10 PM
I've heard stories about the local Admiral/Sylvania dealer who would setup a color TV in the store window, hooked to a timer. People would gather in his parking lot at night to watch Bonanza in living color!

old_tv_nut
03-07-2017, 10:19 PM
I've heard stories about the local Admiral/Sylvania dealer who would setup a color TV in the store window, hooked to a timer. People would gather in his parking lot at night to watch Bonanza in living color!

That's somewhat clever, but did he ever join the crowd and suggest they come in during business hours for a good deal?

Steve McVoy
03-08-2017, 03:39 PM
I worked in an independent RCA dealer TV shop in the late 50s. They had about ten color sets on the floor, but usually only had a couple on at a time.

Department stores, on the other hand, had rows of color sets, all on. Of course they all had different color pictures, mainly because the stores didn't have competent people to set them up.

etype2
03-08-2017, 03:43 PM
Watched this on this mornings Today Show.

https://visions4netjournal.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/img_3903.jpg

All about vintage analogue this week.

DavGoodlin
03-08-2017, 03:59 PM
Oh Prunella :sigh: A few wrong knobs, missing control box door and a BW picture superimposed on a 1963 RCA color set

Tubejunke
03-10-2017, 02:51 AM
it seems like there would be a relatively high cost in having a "wall of tv's" that are prone to regular failures, especially when i imagine they were designs for 2-4 hours of use per day

TVs were never designed to scrape by just a few hours a day between regular failures being corrected. Perhaps sets in the very early days 30s-40s may have been more prone to problems as it was all developmental at that time. By the 50s television was fairly well developed and color (mid 50s) was an expensive reality.

I would venture to say that durability, and performance was WAY more stringently monitored, tested and engineered. Someone mentioned that you must consider the (now) old sets being completely new. None of the years of use and degradation that we see trying to bring them back to life. I wouldn't hesitate to watch a say mid 50s black and white set all day long if the caps were renewed. So I'm sure that back in time the sets at least could play during store hours with little problems like bad tubes. The vacuum tube was the weakest link then and frankly they are more durable then they get credit for these days. They last a pretty darned long time before becoming damaged enough to effect performance.

Enter the age of the transistor and "Solid State" circuitry and you begin to see why it became perceived that old tube sets were prone to regular failure. One tube a year could be considered regular failure. And once solid state had enough years of engineering under it's belt, many sets were made that all but never failed. People at that point would upgrade when a CRT finally gave out.

old_tv_nut
03-10-2017, 10:14 AM
^^^ Tubejunke has it exactly right. My first color set was a Motorola hybrid, and while it never failed outright, the horizontal section would get tired after a year, and the picture would brighten right up again with the replacement of two tubes.

Big Dave
03-10-2017, 02:54 PM
The TODAY show picture... A 6GH8 shorted out. That's my excuse.

davet753
03-12-2017, 05:25 PM
Most independent dealers didn't leave a bunch of sets turned on all day, because 80% of the time or more the display set was the same one that got sold. I used to have about 20 models on display, but didn't usually have more than a couple of extra's in the box.

Of course, in those days there was a distributor in town where we could go and pick up a new one from the warehouse any time.