View Full Version : My First vintage tv. 1950 Hallicraters 600


Donny
08-12-2016, 08:59 AM
A former gf of mine spotted this tv and thought of me. I don't know anything about it other than an image search on google. I would love to know msrp. Confirm the year and know alittle bit more about buying an owning a tv in the 50's. Also how difficult is it typically to get a vintage tv up and running again? I have recapped a few tube radios with some success... No power cord on this set but there looks like a spot for one in the middle of the back area.
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y195/Evilone318/DSC00396.jpg (http://s5.photobucket.com/user/Evilone318/media/DSC00396.jpg.html)

Donny
08-12-2016, 09:03 AM
Sorry about the giant pictures! I haven't used photobucket in years.
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y195/Evilone318/DSC00398.jpg (http://s5.photobucket.com/user/Evilone318/media/DSC00398.jpg.html)
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y195/Evilone318/DSC00395.jpg (http://s5.photobucket.com/user/Evilone318/media/DSC00395.jpg.html)

Electronic M
08-12-2016, 09:47 AM
Will need a recap like any other radio. Make sure the CRT is good before you sink money in it.

decojoe67
08-12-2016, 10:01 AM
Nice find! Any pre-1951 "roundie" TV's are desirable and worth restoring, although the market has softened on all but the rarer, unusual models. As said before, having a good CRT is key. That alone will run $100+ when you find one available. I've never done elec. restos myself, but had many, many TV's done for me over the years. It requires a lot more experience than radio repair. Some sets will work great with just a basic recap and adjustments, but many times these early sets require further tweaking. They're fun to watch, but, unlike today's TV's, are often very finicky.

Electronic M
08-12-2016, 12:07 PM
I've never done elec. restos myself, but had many, many TV's done for me over the years. It requires a lot more experience than radio repair.

If you've never done resto work you don't have the experience to autoritatively comment on what is needed to do it. I was a radio collector/restorer before I got into TVs. Radio repair knowledge gives you enough to fix easy sets...What you lack to do the harder ones we can supply.

Although, reading a period book or two on TV service/operational principles will help greatly. If one knows what each circuit section does, and how they interact it helps troubleshooting work greatly.

John Marinello
08-12-2016, 12:21 PM
If you've never done resto work you don't have the experience to autoritatively comment on what is needed to do it. I was a radio collector/restorer before I got into TVs. Radio repair knowledge gives you enough to fix easy sets...What you lack to do the harder ones we can supply.

Although, reading a period book or two on TV service/operational principles will help greatly. If one knows what each circuit section does, and how they interact it helps troubleshooting work greatly.

...and he also implies that 1951 roundies have little value. I sold 2 1951 Zenith
portholes: One for $1,295, another for $695. The second one wasn't restored.
Just because you are a member here suddenly makes you an authority??

Radiotronman
08-12-2016, 01:07 PM
That's a very nice set and hallicrafters sets don't pop up everyday. If you've done radio repair, than you can repair a tv with a little help. The obvious difference, is be careful with the high voltage areas. I've repaired many tvs, but still need help from time to time. I think we all do from time to time, that's why this site is so great. Test the CRT, but many crts test weak after sitting dormant for a long time. Let it sit in the tester a little while before giving up on it. I've had many sets with weak crts, still produce a watchable picture. Absolutely replace all of the electrolytics first before doing a slow power up. Once restored, that should be a nice set. Great find!

Donny
08-12-2016, 03:31 PM
That's a very nice set and hallicrafters sets don't pop up everyday. If you've done radio repair, than you can repair a tv with a little help. The obvious difference, is be careful with the high voltage areas. I've repaired many tvs, but still need help from time to time. I think we all do from time to time, that's why this site is so great. Test the CRT, but many crts test weak after sitting dormant for a long time. Let it sit in the tester a little while before giving up on it. I've had many sets with weak crts, still produce a watchable picture. Absolutely replace all of the electrolytics first before doing a slow power up. Once restored, that should be a nice set. Great find!

I don't know how to test a crt. I do have an old tube tester somewhere... I was thinking about just doing a recap and crossing my fingers. Also would it be ok to test the tv by using a 40 watt light bulb as a resistor?

Radiotronman
08-12-2016, 03:49 PM
Yes, you could, but I'd replace all of the capacitors and then do a power up. You can get a cheap CRT tester on eBay for $20-40. I haven't run into too many 10-12" crts that were completely dead, so you can just recap it and see if you get a raster. Just make sure you pay attention to the electrolytics. If you're just beginning, it's easy to think all electrolytics have one side going to ground, because in most radios that's the case. Any tubular, black cardboard electrolytics are not grounded and must be wired identically the way they're laid out. Ask any questions you have, the guys on here are very knowledgeable and helpful. When disconnecting the chassis after each power up, ground the second anode connector, before disconnecting from the side of the picture tube. Otherwise you'll get a pretty good shock.

holmesuser01
08-12-2016, 05:26 PM
That's a nice looking set. You're lucky to have people around you that notice these things.

mstaton
08-12-2016, 06:33 PM
It has a giant ass transformer! Probably 15 lbs by itself!

Celt
08-12-2016, 07:34 PM
Here I am 1.5 years old....reaching for our old Hallicrafters... :)

http://www.videokarma.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=165351&d=1256743487

electronjohn
08-13-2016, 11:33 AM
Here I am 1.5 years old....reaching for our old Hallicrafters... :)

http://www.videokarma.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=165351&d=1256743487

Man, does that bring back memories! We had several Hallis when I was a kid...my uncle put himself through college repairing TVs in Gram & Gramps basement. Being a ham operator as well, he had an affinity for Hallicrafters sets...well-built & easy to work on. He'd get a dead set, fix it, and we'd have a new TV!! We had several 21" table models that my Mom referred to as "beer joint TVs" since they looked a lot like sets you'd see mounted up in a corner behind the bar.

Rich12
08-13-2016, 08:37 PM
I've got one on my restore list too. Craigslist find...

http://www.videokarma.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=192131&d=1471134954

Radiotronman
08-13-2016, 09:26 PM
The 7" sets are the only ones I've been able to find. Those are both nice sets you guys have.

http://www.videokarma.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=192132&d=1471137951

Rich12
08-13-2016, 10:13 PM
I'd love to find a nice 7 inch one to restore. Carrying mine from the car to the basement was a workout, that guy is heavy!

Donny
08-14-2016, 09:04 AM
Those are some sweet sets! Btw where would I find schematics and caps?

Electronic M
08-14-2016, 10:34 AM
Look up the sam's number on their site, then look for a place that sells the originals cheaper.....If you restore radios how do you not have a source of caps? (most values TVs use were also in radios)...Tube radios need recaps too, and if you've never recapped a radio you should before you go after a TV.

Donny
08-14-2016, 10:45 AM
Look up the sam's number on their site, then look for a place that sells the originals cheaper.....If you restore radios how do you not have a source of caps? (most values TVs use were also in radios)...Tube radios need recaps too, and if you've never recapped a radio you should before you go after a TV.

It's been years since I've done a radio recap. I've forgotten where I used to buy the caps. I'll do a search and maybe something will spark my memory.

Electronic M
08-14-2016, 11:36 AM
Digikey, Mouser, and Allied are good places. There is also Just radios, capacitor world, and bob's http://www.radioantiques.com/supplies.html which cater to the collector market....Probably more places out there too.

Tim
08-14-2016, 04:52 PM
The Sams you need is set 92 folder 3. I have an extra that is yours for postage. PM your address to me.

Electro44
08-14-2016, 06:33 PM
I have the leatherette 14-808 working that needs a home. I have had the set for about 15 years...never had it out of the cabinet. I have to assume it was recapped before I got it. The picture tube has a brightner on it but it has a nice picture that can be watched for hours. All the correct knobs except the tv/phono knob on the left are missing.

Electronic M
08-14-2016, 08:08 PM
I have the leatherette 14-808 working that needs a home. I have had the set for about 15 years...never had it out of the cabinet. I have to assume it was recapped before I got it. The picture tube has a brightner on it but it has a nice picture that can be watched for hours. All the correct knobs except the tv/phono knob on the left are missing.

Then start an ad in the classifieds!

tvdude1
08-15-2016, 07:06 PM
I have seen Electro 44 set and it does play well.