View Full Version : RCA picture tube guide 1967


old_tv_nut
11-23-2015, 05:26 PM
Lists round 21 inch and rectangular 19 and 25 inch color, all with rare earth phosphor. Shows a picture of a 15GP22, but does not list it.

Last page has list of RCA color TV chronology, starting in 1930!

Also 3 pages of B&W tube characteristics, one page B&W terminal diagrams, three pages B&W interchangeability.

http://www.bretl.com/tvarticles/documents/RCApictubeguide1965.pdf
5MB pdf file

Username1
11-23-2015, 06:49 PM
Thank you !

.

Findm-Keepm
11-23-2015, 07:56 PM
Lists round 21 inch and rectangular 19 and 25 inch color, all with rare earth phosphor. Shows a picture of a 15GP22, but does not list it.

Last page has list of RCA color TV chronology, starting in 1930!

Also 3 pages of B&W tube characteristics, one page B&W terminal diagrams, three pages B&W interchangeability.

http://www.bretl.com/tvarticles/documents/RCApictubeguide1965.pdf
5MB pdf file

Yes, very nice indeed. BTW, the 15GP22 is listed - page 7.

I have the newer 1982/3 version on paper - I've shared it with two or three folks here, as like yours, it's under copyright, and RCA/Thomson denied my request for permission scan and distribute it freely. Only their free stuff apparently could be distributed. Thomson's law firm sent my reply via Fedex overnite, and the letter was like some kind of cease and desist letter. I got my version from the RCA distributor I worked at in 1983/4, for free and had kept it all these years. I assumed that they would allow it, given the distributed non-Thomson reprints of their Receiving Tube guides (RC-XX manuals), but apparently not...

old_tv_nut
11-23-2015, 09:34 PM
RCA/Thomson denied my request for permission

What RCA/Thomson did you contact?
1) I was under the impression that RCA only exists as a product brand for foreign-made miscellany; they certainly do not make these CRTs any more.
2) This seems to be an abominable lawyers' over-reaction to fair use of historical material for educational purposes. You should have asked if they could supply a copy for a price - I'd bet they cannot.
3) As I do for everything I post, I will remove it if requested by the copyright holder, but in this case, again, I would argue that it comes under fair use.

Findm-Keepm
11-23-2015, 10:35 PM
What RCA/Thomson did you contact?
1) I was under the impression that RCA only exists as a product brand for foreign-made miscellany; they certainly do not make these CRTs any more.
2) This seems to be an abominable lawyers' over-reaction to fair use of historical material for educational purposes. You should have asked if they could supply a copy for a price - I'd bet they cannot.
3) As I do for everything I post, I will remove it if requested by the copyright holder, but in this case, again, I would argue that it comes under fair use.

My 82/83 CRT guide has no copyright clause, or symbol on it, just like yours.

I wrote to the email address legal@thomson.com, and got a reply to send a written request to a lawyer at a firm in New York. I sent a two page letter, and about a month later, the law firm answered in a 4-page letter sent via Fedex. They had a photocopy (more like a microfiche print copy) of the front cover of the CRT guide attached to the letter. On this was a white label, about 3"x5" with a whole bunch of info - mostly file names and creation or edit dates. The letter basically stated while I could use it for my use, and any duplication permission was denied. They stated the copyright was based on derivative work, and listed the RCA tube manual, a dozen or so RCA CRT engineering data sheets, and the copyright filing date for each. I'll never forget the closing statement (copied from an archived email I sent) - "Mr Clark, please forgo this folly and understand we have over 100 years experience in copyright infringement litigation. Our team exists first and foremost to protect the rightful property of Thomson and it's subsidiary companies. Any appearance of this publication (booklet) in the public domain, in any form other than original print, and we will be forced to unleash the full letter of the law in seeking damages, criminal reclaim, and expedient seizure of any profit from the endeavor." Needless to say, I gave up.

Some time later, i got a letter saying a firm in Paris now represented Thomson, and then another letter saying Thomson had changed it's structure and gave an address and fax to use for correspondence, as if I wanted to continue with something. They definitely had me on their radar for a bit.

Somewhere in the world, I figure that Technicolor probably has a massive file of everything RCA ever created, all cross-referenced for copyright inclusion, just so the shell that was RCA can still create revenue from litigation. I noticed that all RCA trademarks with the USPTO are registered through the Paris firm - they do keep all of that up-to-date, and they're probably churning out copyright renewals as well.

Hey, I tried. Most of the CRT guide I have is 25V tubes for later stuff, but is lacking in the A63-series stuff, the Sylvania and Raun stuff, and of course, the Asian CRTs as well. I'd love for some technical writer type to compile all I mentioned into a reference databook, so that it couldn't fall under derivative protection. Imagine one guide that lets you know all the good data - low focus, skinny/standard neck, eared or not, and the anode arrangement - for all CRTs.

Electronic M
11-23-2015, 11:56 PM
I have the newer 1982/3 version on paper - I've shared it with two or three folks here...

If that goes into the 70's to end-of-the-era Delta-gun CRTs I'd enjoy a copy for reference....

I wonder if those legal pinheads would actually find it on VK, or bother to complain if they did?

andy
11-24-2015, 01:29 AM
If that goes into the 70's to end-of-the-era Delta-gun CRTs I'd enjoy a copy for reference....

I wonder if those legal pinheads would actually find it on VK, or bother to complain if they did?

It wouldn't even occur to me to ask permission before posting scans of a 30 year old brochure. Sounds like a law firm trying to justify their fee. I've never even heard of anyone getting into trouble for posting something like that. Considering all the web sites selling scans of service manuals (presumably without permission), I can't imagine they would care about something like this.

ChrisW6ATV
11-24-2015, 02:29 AM
Thank you for posting that guide, Wayne. It is very informative.

I notice that it lists the 7JP4, though RCA never made any electrostatic-CRT sets, but does not have the 7DP4 for their own 621TS.

Findm-Keepm
11-24-2015, 09:35 PM
It wouldn't even occur to me to ask permission before posting scans of a 30 year old brochure. Sounds like a law firm trying to justify their fee. I've never even heard of anyone getting into trouble for posting something like that. Considering all the web sites selling scans of service manuals (presumably without permission), I can't imagine they would care about something like this.

What spurred me to ask? I searched to see if the guide was already online via Google - and a Google news result (when Google used to display news stories related to your search, much like they do now with images) had a news item where a University (I think it was Iowa State) student was posting RCA PA Amp service literature to a public accessible university server, and RCA trolls found the stuff, and he and the school were threatened by RCA lawyers. They did the DMCA thing and removed the offending copies, but the University had already experienced "exposure" and kicked the student out. The article went on to say that a simple request often cleared the way, so I was enlightened. The rest is in my narrative above.

Just following the letter of the law. Remember, anything with the copyright not renewed that was published 1964 and prior is clear, but due diligence is still required - many companies exist only on copyright clearance fees.

Edit: I ain't a lawyer, so follow my advice with extreme caution.

GE/RCA/Harris did grant permission to reproduce individual datasheets, app notes, and sales literature, but no service lit, no "accessory guides" or databooks. Raytheon was similar - our Navy pubs office had all the copyright clearance details for most manufacturers, as the DoD went all-electronic with their commercially produced paper publications in 1998/99. Tektronix has always been the most lenient - all out-of-print service lit entered the public domain by a letter posted in 1997 to the web. One of my buddies made a fortune scanning and selling Tek reprints in the early days of eBay. One of Disney's Imagineers bought some 300 bucks worth of reprints from him on Easter Sunday in 1998. I have a copy of his 120GB server drive, but nothing I really need, and there are probably better copies elsewhere...

old_tv_nut
11-24-2015, 10:14 PM
i'd be interested to know how recently these various things happened.

bgadow
11-24-2015, 11:18 PM
All very interesting. I wonder just what exists of the "RCA archives" these days?

In the mid-80s, this snotty-nosed young collector wrote to RCA regarding his Radiola 18 & mid-50s console TV; and to Zenith regarding this early 50's AM/FM table model. Both companies sent me kind letters with production dates. The RCA letter (pre-GE) also gave production totals. I may still have those tucked away somewhere.

Findm-Keepm
11-25-2015, 10:37 AM
i'd be interested to know how recently these various things happened.

It was 2007, right after I joined the forum.

I didn't mean to rain on any parade, and I'm grateful you shared the copy you have. I shared mine, just not publicly. Not being righteous, but they do have my name and address on file....:scratch2::sigh::worried::dammit:

As to the archives, I dunno, but Thomson definitely had a micofiche/microfilm copy of the CRT data guide I have - their reply had a copy of the front cover, made from what I believe to be a microfiche. I'd imagine that was the most secure, stable means for RCA in the 80s.