View Full Version : What does collecting old tv's mean to young people?


oldtvman
09-27-2015, 09:19 AM
Here's an interesting question. A good share of those who frequent this site either grew up in the era or were involved in the business. I grew up when color tv was just a novelty, but I thought it was the most amazing thing out there.

So what drives you young guys to pursue collecting these old dinosaurs?

miniman82
09-27-2015, 09:35 AM
Preservation of history (I also enjoy WWII stuff), and who doesn't like toobs?

Sandy G
09-27-2015, 12:11 PM
We NEVER had a Roundie when I was a Tadpole, but I knew how SPECIAL they were....Still think so !

Arcanine
09-27-2015, 12:45 PM
I almost believe me and Tom (Electronic M) are the youngest members here that are so involved with old televisions like this.

I'm 29, and I was born in 1986. My earliest memories are of that Zenith Television I still have, and use this day. Unusually my memory began to retain stuff as early as Late 1987, according to mom when I described what I remember to her.

I grew up in front of a television. I used to remember looking forward to getting home to play Nintendo on my little 13" Sony Trinitron. I still have that set to this day.

I feel older tech, while regarded as "primitive" now, is better built then anything you can walk out and purchase now from (Big box store of choice), and nothing lasts like it used too. Craftsmanship is gone, quality is gone. Nothing feels quite like watching an old CRT television, the bright colors, the smooth image, the easy to understand functions, that reflection of the glass screen when lights are near.

Yeah, you can go out to (big box store) and buy a 32" TV for almost under $200 now from some Asian company no one has ever heard of, and it'll last you two or three years.

I remember when a 32" Sony cost upwards of a grand plus for the better models, and many of those are still working to this day.

Getting off topic.

I found my way in to antique television when I was a kid. I always liked vacuum tube radios, and I had a few when I was 14/15, and then I learned TV's had tubes too! It went from there. I just love antique televisions. I want to preserve them, and enjoy them, and let them stand as a testament to a lost piece of history.

All my "cool kids" friends can watch their HDTV LED flat monstrosities at their home, then they come visit me in my home and they're totally blown away by my old televisions, and most have never even SEEN a television as old as mine are, and they sit down, with excitement, and watch my vintage sets in total awe. I put on some classic Star Trek or something, and it's all smiles, and "wow this is the coolest thing!", and they watch with out ever thinking twice that they're looking in to a 50+ year old screen.

Nothing, and I do mean NOTHING compares to watching classic TV, on a classic TV set.

I get a real delight from the smiles my old TV's bring when people see them, and watch them for the first time. I get endless enjoyment from them, my self. I always like to sit back and watch my color roundy, even with the vertical issues, I still enjoy it

Jon A.
09-27-2015, 01:47 PM
1. I like to do what almost no one else does because following trends is boring to me.
2. I've had an interest in electronics since I was a kid.
3. Before the internet, most of my spare time was spent in front of a TV.
4. I grew up around people who didn't have the latest of everything, so it's a nostalgia trip to use stuff about my age or older.
5. I appreciate the quality and styling from my chosen time period enough to surround myself with items from that time for an authentic feel.

MRX37
09-27-2015, 02:39 PM
I'm not much older then Arcanine. For me, collecting old stuff, including TV's serves a few purposes:

1: A bit of nostalga, though I'm not one to indulge much in that.

2: Older TV's, older electronics, they worked different, they looked different, and they were built different. TV's are a prime example. With new flat panel sets, something is lost. The picture is better, the sound? From what I've heard not so much. They're fragile, especially the screens, they aren't built as well, and there's less substance, less variety. Swap the brand labels and it'd be hard to tell who made what.

3: Every piece of old electronics I find or receive is a history lesson in and of itself. Everything from a BPC set, to that 50 year old tube TV I found a few months ago has a story to tell about its life.

And 4: I wouldn't have much of what I own today if it wasn't for collecting old electronics. Much of what I own has been found and often repaired.

wa2ise
09-27-2015, 02:55 PM
"Young man, back in my day, TVs were black and white".. And there was no cable... :D

MRX37
09-27-2015, 03:35 PM
"Young man, back in my day, TVs were black and white".. And there was no cable... :D

And you had to wait for picture AND sound to come up. First it would be the sound, followed by the picture appearing very dim and large, and as the set warmed up it would shrink and become brighter.

And you had only three channels to watch back then, one which only came in on a good day, and if the President was making a speech, all three channels would be covering it and nothing else would be on!

And back in your day you had to listen to your parents tell you about how they walked 20 miles to school, barefoot in the snow...

vts1134
09-27-2015, 03:53 PM
When I was growing up my mother didn't have a television for quite some time. We were very poor and rented rooms of our house out to other people. One of the people who stayed with us had a tiny portable B&W television. I used to watch Peter Davidson as Doctor Who until the wee hours of the night on that TV. TV was fascinating to me back then. As I got older it became commonplace and boring. I think a small part of me collects to make TVs fascinating and special again. As Nick said preservation of history is also a factor and I love telling the story of television from the 1878 illustration of "Edison's Telephonoscope" all the way through to television's eventual ubiquity in America's living room. The very best part about this hobby, and the thing that keeps me hooked, is the community. The eagerness to help, the generosity, the patience and skill to talk a complete beginner with zero knowledge of electronics through a restoration of a tube based television, it truly makes this hobby so special.

Oh and yea I'm with Nick...who doesn't like tubes?

LovesZenith
09-27-2015, 05:43 PM
I think I can take the title for youngest enthusiast here (I'm 16). My oldest set now is from 1981, but I really do want some tube stuff. What draws me to vintage televisions is that they were so special to the people that owned them. These were people who survived the depression, and spending $1000s of dollars in today's money on them. They were so well built, and taken care of for that matter. The kids I go to school with are all so spoiled, and have to have the latest gadgets. I actually heard one child at lunch telling his friends how he was going to "accidentally" drop his year old Iphone in a sewer drain so his parents would buy him the newest one. Back to televisions - It is magical to me to walk to the front of a big wooden box to click a knob, and hearing it warm up, make noises, and suddenly throw thousands of tiny dots onto a piece of glass. Today, you press a button on a remote, and a flat black rectangle on the wall instantly shows harsh, too bright images. The sounds are different too. Tube audio is so warm, friendly, and inviting, I could listen to it for hours. Flat screen's sound is so dull and irritating. The old sets themselves are better, better made, better sounding, the colors are warm and pleasant. The same goes for vinyl records, they sound so good and alive compared to flat, boring MP3 files. They have more emotion, it gets in your bones. I don't have memories of walking into TV dealerships, or having the 1st color set, but the TVs carry nostalgia. They make me have those memories. It's an entirely different world these days, and I don't like it. I'm severely jealous of all of you guys who were around back then. My whole life has been, and will be, dedicated to keeping that lost old world alive. The clothes I wear, the things I own, the car I drive, the music I listen to, and the way I talk. I see all these dogtanking hipsters who destroy and deface old tvs and console stereos, and it makes me furious. I know I'm certainly a minority in my age group, if not the only one. I want to get all of these things, tvs and stereos and such, to save them from those people. I don't currently own a set too old, but I'm certainly trying. I don't know a thing about electronics, but I'll certainly learn so I can keep these things alive.

TUD1
09-27-2015, 06:04 PM
I agree 100% with everything LovesZenith said above. I'll be 17 in less than a week, and I just love old stuff. I'm in Birmingham, AL, so there are quite a few good thrift stores and flea malls to find old electronics.

stromberg6
09-27-2015, 06:19 PM
I agree 100% with everything LovesZenith said above. I'll be 17 in less than a week, and I just love old stuff. I'm in Birmingham, AL, so there are quite a few good thrift stores and flea malls to find old electronics.

Your post made me smile. Happy that you can find good stuff where you are! I grew up in the 50s and 60s, and used to drive my parents nuts when ever I brought home another "piece of junk". Now driving my wife crazy LOL. I progressed from AA5s, and now really enjoy TV restoration (positively love early color!),and especially vintage audio.
Best of luck in the enjoyment of your passion, and don't let anyone discourage you! :thmbsp:
Kevin
p.s. Hard as it may be, try not to become a hoarder. :D

bgadow
09-27-2015, 09:37 PM
At 43, I'm out of the real "youngster" crowd now, but most of what I have is older than me. Tubes have always been a fascination for me. We didn't have a solid state TV in the house until the early 80s so I had plenty of chance to stare at those glowing bulbs through the back of a couple old GE sets. On the other hand, the only tube radios I'd seen were beautiful but didn't work. When I found a working AA5, it was just magic. I've been hooked ever since.

jbivy
09-27-2015, 10:36 PM
I get the same feeling from restoring a tv and seeing a picture come up nice and clear, as when i get a classic car to sputter back to life after decades of sleeping. Theyre not "junk" anymore, they have a purpose again.

I dont know why i love to repair old things. I just do. Its cool, its history, with a bit of help it can be working history again. Plus, what else do i have to do in my spare time BUT play with old junk? ;)

Sandy G
09-27-2015, 10:53 PM
Guys, I feel like there will be a small, but DETERMINED bunch of enthusiasts who would THANK us from, say, the year 2115, that WE took the time & trouble to "Restore" a bunch of these old things... Been a history buff all my life, & getting to "Save" a little of it, figures in BIG w/me... Also takes me back.. When I was growing up, "Happiness" was curled up in my Mama's lap, watching the "Huntley/Brinkley Report". I THINK we had a big old Zenith, & it put out quite a bit of heat.. That good, warm "Homey" smell that comes only from Tooob stuff. That was B4 LBJ's "Great Society", we ended up getting a 1st rate cable TV system early on, as we were "Disadvantaged", & the Gummint thought getting a cable TV system, would lift us out of the isolation, & backwardness that was endemic around here.

Kamakiri
09-28-2015, 12:49 AM
Guys, I feel like there will be a small, but DETERMINED bunch of enthusiasts who would THANK us from, say, the year 2115, that WE took the time & trouble to "Restore" a bunch of these old things...

That may be truer than you think. What many people don't realize is that we here have been internet "pioneers". One day everything we talk about today might be used as a guide to future generations of VK members. And there will be people joining this site long after we're all gone....oddly enough.

Arcanine
09-28-2015, 01:09 AM
That may be truer than you think. What many people don't realize is that we here have been internet "pioneers". One day everything we talk about today might be used as a guide to future generations of VK members. And there will be people joining this site long after we're all gone....oddly enough.

I'm not gonna lie. I drove my mom nuts when I was kid, hauling home peoples toss out TV's and playing with them.

I was over joyed when I found this site. I thought "Oh my god! Like minded people who collect TELEVISIONS! THEY COLLECT FIX AND RESTORE OLD CRT TV'S! OH MY GOD THEY EVEN HAVE A SECTION FOR PORTABLE LITTLE TV'S! oh look, they have a section for vintage color sets. I always wanted a vintage color that worked!"

fsjonsey
09-28-2015, 03:30 AM
I'm 25. By the time I was 8 years old I became enamored with vintage radios. I blame my grandparents Depression era radio stories, dad telling me he had the first color TV on his street, and Ken Burns' Empire of The Air for that. By age 10 I had 20 tube radios ranging from the 1930's to 1960's that neighbors gave me, and my parents bought during our trips to the local antique malls. By age 12 I learned to solder and do basic troubleshooting using what I learned from the internet (Phils Old Radios). Since most of what I collected were basic AA5 radios, I got pretty good at recapping. That same year I flipped from radios to tube HiFi (I was getting into classic rock and Jazz) and fell in with a couple of guys who ran a vintage audio shop in Lakewood, OH that no longer exists. They sold my dad a restored Fisher 500B for $120 as a Christmas present, to get me into the hobby. That Fisher gave way to ever more complex tube hifi setups that evolved into the McIntosh/Leak/Altec system I run today. I bought my first vintage TV, a 1956 Zenith Bugeye, at an antique mall in Columbus, OH in 2007 with lawn mowing money. I recapped the set and it worked well, and later a fellow VK member sent me a new CRT for it some years later. College came, I got my first tube color set, a 1966 Zenith in 2011, and I still use it to this day. Now I own a recording studio that uses vintage analog audio equipment wherever possible, in a building filled with my collection of vintage TV's and Radios.

Basically, my attraction to vintage electronics is rooted in the fact that they were something totally different, that I never actually got to experience growing up in the 1990's and early 2K's. Tube electronics felt more real to me. Also the history- That we, as a nation, were able to do so much with technology that everyone today sees as completely archaic. The brilliant industrial design was also a factor. Seeing beautiful old radios and TV's when I was surrounded in a sea of black plastic electronics pulled me in.

decojoe67
09-28-2015, 05:28 AM
I'm 48 and remember when, in the late '70's-early '80's when TV collecting was a very limited area of the radio collecting hobby. Period magazine articles on the subject would often start out with something like "people collect old barbed-wire, door-knobs.....so why not old televisions..." referring to it as being pretty odd. I personally was blown-away by the look of vintage TV's at the time, but focused on radios because of how odd it seemed to actually purchase an old TV. It took well into the '90's, when TV collecting got more wide-spread, before I finally started to collect what I liked the most.
I see vintage TV's as the closest thing to time-travel as you an you find, and everyone loves the idea of time-travel. Having an early dusty "as-found" TV restored, and the first time watching a period show on it, is a total thrill for me. All these years later, it has never gotten old.

kvflyer
09-28-2015, 08:06 AM
Here goes! I'm 67 and my Dad worked at the Glenn L. Martin company for a good part of his life. As you may know, defense work if often at the whim of the current ellected officials. So you could have a great job for years and get laid off in a New York minute.

He dabbled in a little TV and radio repair. I watched him but didn't really understand exactly what he did. I did become interested and when I went into the army, I got formal electronics training. Solid state electronics was the hot new stuff so I was all into it. Vacuum tubes went by the way of the buggy whip. Also, when the rectangular color CRT came out, I had no use for the round screen. Heck, we had gotten rid round BW CRT years ago!

For years, I loved the newest stuff but could only afford very little due to my modest income and lifestyle. 15 years, ago, I discovered eBay and the ability to obtain items that were memories from the past. I found out that those old ancient looking round CRTs were rather cool. I got an RCA CTC-9 and have started a restoration. It is still on hold due to some family issues (nothing bad, just time consuming) and look forward to completing it. It has a raster so that's a good sign.

I should mention that after getting out of the army, I built a Heathkit console TV. All transistors of course. That got my interest in the TV part of electronics. I guess I have had a renaissance because I really like the older stuff. Yes, I do have surround sound and a 60" LCD set. But watching Broderick Crawford in "Highway Patrol" (2150 to Headqarters!") on my Admiral 26R12 Bakelite console.

The Admiral is the exact model that I had as a teenager. It's restored and has an NOS CRT. I also have the first color set that Dad got when I was in high school, 1967. That too is in queue. I guess I should stop rambling on; the coffee has not kicked in yet ;).

So, I understand the process and also hope our younger "Whipper Snappers" will carry on. It really is nice to bring an old set back to life. You can even transmit to your vinatage set from your set top box or DVD player and watch those old shows. Cool...

Countryford
09-28-2015, 08:50 AM
I'm 32. I started collecting radios first when I was 12. My dad and I went to a few garage sales one day. At one of the sales, there was about 4 tube radios. I fell in love and was hooked ever since. I bought all that they had and that started my collection. Several years later, once I was 16, I was at an antique store and found a Philco TV. Guess what, it came home with me.

I don't have much experience working on them. I'm at a point where I need to work on them and not collect anymore.

Sandy G
09-28-2015, 09:25 AM
Another thing-Radio collecting can be one of the few areas where a person of MODEST means can STILL build himself an impressive collection of things that were & are considered "The Best there is..." I am, of course, referring to the Collins designed R-390 series.

etype2
09-28-2015, 11:27 AM
And you had to wait for picture AND sound to come up. First it would be the sound, followed by the picture appearing very dim and large, and as the set warmed up it would shrink and become brighter.

And you had only three channels to watch back then, one which only came in on a good day, and if the President was making a speech, all three channels would be covering it and nothing else would be on!

And back in your day you had to listen to your parents tell you about how they walked 20 miles to school, barefoot in the snow...


Love your comment. It's all true! You sound much older. Kicken A!

I'm 69, not the oldest here. My mother showed me the damage to her feet from frostbite walking long distances in the snow to work. Her parents pulled her out of sixth grade school to help the large family during the depression.

Fast forward to the early fifties when I went to school. We had no school buses and yes I walked though snowstorms and snow drifts to get to school.

Yup, we had three channels and later one UHF channel. For Milwaukee folks it was channels 4, 6, 12 and 18, NBC, ABC, CBS and the independent.

When I was a kid, on Saturdays, had the entire morning planned out in front of the tube. First, cartoons like Roadrunner, then Hop Along Cassidy, then Fury, then Sky King, topping the morning off with Mr. Wizard. Just fascinated by the glow of tubes behind the vents and the little dot that faded out when the set was turned off.

And when I saw color tv for the first time in 1956 .... Don't even get me started. I will just say it was magical.

wa2ise
09-28-2015, 11:34 AM
That may be truer than you think. What many people don't realize is that we here have been internet "pioneers". ...

I've been on the 'net since 1987, before the web was invented. Back then it was a UNIX test based system. Usenews forums were what we used. All text, no pictures. rec.antiques.radio+phono was the equivalent to videokarma in the day. Just being able to participate in a world wide forum, at no cost beyond a fixed monthly fee from an ISP, was great. You didn't have to pass thru a filter, like a magazine editor. Except for moderated groups, of course.

DavGoodlin
09-28-2015, 01:17 PM
I'm 52 and by age 8, was plugging in stuff found in farmhouse attics, basements and barns of many family members. I often recall waiting until I got sound on a TV, then chickening out before anything scary happened. Pretty soon I had a reputation for getting stuff to work, leading to many gifts of appliances, radios and by age 12, TV sets. After learning that a few new capacitors would KEEP stuff working (more than 5 minutes), it was downhill from there.

Fortunately, we had a house with a huge daylight basement and my parents understood a need for a hobby for a kid who was lousy at sports, with no other talent but accident-free tinkering. It was cold in the winter, often I pulled chassis out and slid many a color console set up two flights of carpeted stairs to my room, never breaking a CRT in the process. Its funny how much care can be taken and brute strength you can muster saving old technology. I also was on the roof often trying to get the perfect array of aluminum to work in an awful location surrounded by densely-wooded hills. Digital has renewed this interest in antennas and Dx'ing with a vengeance.

As a high schooler in Electronics Vo-Tech, I learned to tackle early color set issues using B&K 1077B television analyst, then I was VERY fortunate to work under some senior techs who learned electronics in the service, came home and then made TV repair their business. As they retired, I became a curator of test equipment and parts, mostly tubes:)

If I ever meet anyone in my area who likes old radios and TV and is younger, they can have plenty of my stuff - free, to pass it along as was done years ago. We do our best work here by matching spare parts with sets in need, and sets in need of homes with new owners:)

NowhereMan 1966
09-28-2015, 02:20 PM
When I was growing up my mother didn't have a television for quite some time. We were very poor and rented rooms of our house out to other people. One of the people who stayed with us had a tiny portable B&W television. I used to watch Peter Davidson as Doctor Who until the wee hours of the night on that TV. TV was fascinating to me back then. As I got older it became commonplace and boring. I think a small part of me collects to make TVs fascinating and special again. As Nick said preservation of history is also a factor and I love telling the story of television from the 1878 illustration of "Edison's Telephonoscope" all the way through to television's eventual ubiquity in America's living room. The very best part about this hobby, and the thing that keeps me hooked, is the community. The eagerness to help, the generosity, the patience and skill to talk a complete beginner with zero knowledge of electronics through a restoration of a tube based television, it truly makes this hobby so special.

Oh and yea I'm with Nick...who doesn't like tubes?

Did you live in the Pittsburgh area all your life? If so, most likely you watched Dr. Who on WQEX, channel 16, it was the low cost sister station to WQED, channel 13. IIRC, they broadcasted in black and white well into the 1980's. They used to show a lot of the "Brit-Coms" and British Sci-Fi. I remember one night I heard Mom laughing so hard and wonder why. I walked out and saw her watching "Red Dwarf" on Channel 16 and got me hooked.

I lived in the Pittsburgh area until I lose the house form the death of my mother two years ago although I moved in August of 2014, I'm still close by in Ohio, just north of Wheeling, WV.

NowhereMan 1966
09-28-2015, 02:28 PM
I'm 49, always been interested in electronics and radio as well as old TV. The oldest TV I remember was our B&W 1959 Philco with no UHF tuner. I remember sitting with Mom watching the Moon landings and Christmas cartoons and shows. In Pittsburgh, we could get channels 2, 4, 11, 13, 16 and 53, later we had 22. We could get channel 7 from Wheeling, channel 9 from Steubenville, channel 6 from Johnstown, and 21, 27 and 33 from Youngstown. I'm glad to see the millennials here and around taking up the torch for us, sadly, we will not live forever but I'm glad there will be custodians of history in the future.

hi_volt
09-28-2015, 03:08 PM
I got into collecting old radios and TV sets back when I was a young teenager. When I was in college, I ran a TV sales and repair business out of my apartment. Most of the sets I worked on were from the CTC-10 through CTC-40 era. I've always had a warm spot in my heart for color roundies, probably because of the great memories I had in college.

Sandy G
09-28-2015, 03:24 PM
I have, what is undoubtedly, the 1st TV in town. Its my unassuming 1948 7" Admiral "1911A11" bakelite set. The old guy who owned the theater in town had it, he also ran a shop where he fixed radios, & his daughter ran the theater for YEARS after his death. My Uncle told me that he had a place fixed up on a hill outside of town, w/AC power, & an antenna, & during the summer months, he'd tote the Admiral up there, & he & his buddies would try to pick up WSB or WAGA out of Atlanta, & catch a baseball game on it. I never got an Atlanta station up there, but, I picked up everything else.. At least 2 or 3 network feeds, a BUNCH of PBS stations, & all kinds of indie UHF stuff. I took a JVC CX-500 US "All-in-Wonder" 4.5" color set up there a BUNCH of times.

sweitzel
09-28-2015, 04:51 PM
I'm 40 and used to collect all sorts of things: vintage computers, vintage radios, cameras, records, audio processors, and film projectors and prints. I read this site because I really am not in a position to start collecting vintage televisions. As my dear wife so eloquently put it a number of years ago: "You really need to choose one thing to collect or things are really going to get out of control" She was right. I sold most of the computers except one (Apple Lisa), and sold a lot of my cameras, and sold my vintage radios (except one a Zenith 8S463) and chose focus collecting my projectors and prints. It really made my hobby fun as having so many other things just distracted from one another. I like "collecting" televisions virtually through the discussions on this site and in real life am building a cinema on my property to someday install the projectors and platters and audio racks and have my own place to watch my films.

Jon A.
09-28-2015, 06:21 PM
It was cold in the winter, often I pulled chassis out and slid many a color console set up two flights of carpeted stairs to my room, never breaking a CRT in the process. Its funny how much care can be taken and brute strength you can muster saving old technology.
No kidding. I had to get my Electrohome console out through a sliding door, onto my convertible hand truck without scratching it, then up a rather tricky set of steps that curve around the house (fortunately I had a spotter to give it a boost over each step), then I pushed it 1.24 kilometers (about 3/4 of a mile) home. At least that's the shortest distance I've traveled to bring home a set.

MRX37
09-28-2015, 06:29 PM
Try wrestling a 60 inch rear projection behemoth into your house by yourself. Big, heavy, and unweildy as hell.

The only thing that beats that is a damn Trinitron!

Sandy G
09-28-2015, 10:14 PM
Try wrestling a 60 inch rear projection behemoth into your house by yourself. Big, heavy, and unweildy as hell.

The only thing that beats that is a damn Trinitron!

No kiddin'. I manhandled a 36" Trinitron all by my lonesome, ONCE. That was QUITE enuff, Thank You Very Much..

Tom9589
09-28-2015, 10:29 PM
I once saw two 56" Trinitrons in the Coca-Cola boardroom in Atlanta. They said it took a forklift to bring them into the room. I don't doubt them. They really looked good!

Username1
09-28-2015, 10:34 PM
Kids think anyone over 20 is crazy anyway..... so who cares what they think.....

.

Dave S
09-30-2015, 12:02 PM
...we here have been internet "pioneers".

I am WAY charmed by that thought!

oldtvman
10-01-2015, 06:00 PM
Like I said, growing up in the fifties, things were just starting to blossom, stereo sound, transistor radio and color television. My dad took me to a tv store for something and there among the b & w sets were two color tv's on and I think the show was The price is right.

From that point as a kid you could only wish you had one, and to make it worse when color shows came on the NBC Peacock would come on and taunt you, reminding you that this show was in full color, but not for you. Everytime we would go to Sears or any big department store I would head for the tv Dept to see if any color shows were on.

Glenz75
10-27-2015, 10:54 PM
I'm not quite half way there yet (just turned 40) and I probably have the biggest collection on vintage TV sets in New Zealand last count around 50 or so but all currently in storage due to some major life changes over the past year.
We need this young blood to carry on the preservation of these old sets and its good to see there are young people getting interested in vintage technology as they will be the ones who will end up being the custodians of it all eventually.:D

kf4rca
10-28-2015, 09:33 AM
You need to periodically go in there and wipe down all your sets of mildew. I use a chlorine water mix (made from clorox bleach). That'll be good for about a year.
But I heard there is a product called Clearshell (made by ZEP) which is better!

ZackN920
10-28-2015, 10:56 AM
"What does collecting old tv's mean to young people?"

Well to other young people, I must be a nut. lol I don't know, Never really thought about it. I guess, to me it's just preservation, and actually enjoying them. I don't mind black & white, while most other's my age group(i'm 22), would think your crazy if ya watch something in black and white.

Dubis7
10-28-2015, 11:44 AM
Born in '96, so I guess I can fairly answer this.

It's hard to say for sure. I have older parents, but they've always been happy to no longer have to deal with tubes. I learned about this stuff from them, and decided to spring on a 1950s radio when I was 15. Then I realized you can actually WORK on these things, instead of throwing them out, so I decided to learn that. I started getting obsessive about getting only mid century appliances, though I can't really justify that beyond "I like them better." So I guess now it's some combination of sustainability, and the fact that I started young and it's just a part of my childhood that I'm very close to.

Sandy G
10-28-2015, 08:44 PM
I remember in the summer of 1969, my Dad took all of us to New York City. What an AMAZING place, especially for a 12 yr old boy from the wilds of Tennessee.. I remember we walked down this one street that had NOTHING but electronics shops on it,& OMG-I had died & gone to Heaven ! There were a BUNCH of those Symphonic "Minni TVs" all playing in one shop's showcase, I THINK they had a similar bunch of Sony 4" & 5" playing. There MAY have been one of the fabled 7" Trinitron-KV-7010Us, too, but I can't say for sure. And then there were the CARS-Like a lot of 12 yr old boys, I had a "Radar" that would go off when an interesting car rode by... I had to IGNORE it, the Caddy limos were almost "Overloading" it. Quite a few Rolls & Mercedes 600s, too. Not too many "Sports Cars", however, Manhattan just wasn't a good place to be tootling along in a Maserati. or Ferrari. I was JUST starting to think that Girls might actually be good for something beyond tossing rocks at, had LOTS to look at in THAT dept, too..

etype2
10-29-2015, 11:31 AM
I remember in the summer of 1969, my Dad took all of us to New York City. What an AMAZING place, especially for a 12 yr old boy from the wilds of Tennessee.. I remember we walked down this one street that had NOTHING but electronics shops on it,& OMG-I had died & gone to Heaven ! There were a BUNCH of those Symphonic "Minni TVs" all playing in one shop's showcase, I THINK they had a similar bunch of Sony 4" & 5" playing. There MAY have been one of the fabled 7" Trinitron-KV-7010Us, too, but I can't say for sure. And then there were the CARS-Like a lot of 12 yr old boys, I had a "Radar" that would go off when an interesting car rode by... I had to IGNORE it, the Caddy limos were almost "Overloading" it. Quite a few Rolls & Mercedes 600s, too. Not too many "Sports Cars", however, Manhattan just wasn't a good place to be tootling along in a Maserati. or Ferrari. I was JUST starting to think that Girls might actually be good for something beyond tossing rocks at, had LOTS to look at in THAT dept, too..

I might of been standing right there next to you oggaling those tiny TV's on 42nd Street. I was in the Navy at the time. I'd come down on weekend leave and stay Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The Sony KV 7010U was taken off the market in 1968, but the KV 7010UA would have been in those windows.

Sandy G
10-29-2015, 07:05 PM
I wanted to go to the Empire State Bldg, but Henry, my Dad, said he didn't know how to get there... I THINK both World Trade Centers were "Up There,
by then, pretty sure ONE of 'em was, anyway. ANOTHER street we went down-My Mom had FITS, was the "Diamond Street"= Both sides of the street were crammed full of these TINY shops, populated by these ODD looking guys who wore these "Old Timey" suits, white shirts, NO tie, & these hats that were pitch black, but looked like somethin' outta the 1920s,or Thirties. My Dad said they were Acidic Jews, & I SHOULDN't STARE at 'Em. We SURE didn't have ANYBODY who looked like THAY at home.

Username1
10-29-2015, 08:02 PM
"Acidic Jews" - Ha ! I like that..... The real real good electronics crap was on Canal st.
You ever get a time machine, you remember to set it for Canal St. 1969....

.

Sandy G
10-29-2015, 08:37 PM
"Acidic Jews" - Ha ! I like that..... The real real good electronics crap was on Canal st.
You ever get a time machine, you remember to set it for Canal St. 1969....

.

Hehehehe... When school took up again, I went to the library, & told the librarian about seein' those "Acidic Jews"... NOBODY could figger out what I meant, until the Principal-Who sat in the pew in front of us in the Presbyterian Church-quizzed Mama & Daddy about it, & THEN he realized what I meant... NOT "Acidic", but "HASIDIC"... I've had a few Joosh friends thru the years, & they always get a Kick from that story... TOTALLY innocent, but my Mountain Brogue betrayed me..WHAT was the street that had the REALLY "Good" electronic junque shoppes on it, it was COMPLETELY obliterated by the WTC complex ? It was a REAL "Radio Row", & about any kind of tube, widget, hooberbloob you could name was likely there, in abundance ? There was a Rat's warren of streets there, that they completely did away with...

RetroFormat32
05-22-2016, 02:28 PM
I was born in 1998, and my first exposure to vintage TV collecting was watching YouTube videos of all the American sets out there.. And then at one point I had 20 TVs.. Now it's reduced down to 10, 8 at the old house and 2 here. One of them is my 1958 Empress Electronics Super Fringe, which I use as a radio because the TV section needs a new 6AL3 horizontal output tube.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

David Roper
05-22-2016, 07:49 PM
It's a damper, which is essential for horizontal sweep (at least in the 99.21% of magnetic deflection sets that use one) but the large beam pentode that gets its plate voltage from the damper is properly called the horizontal output tube.

wkand
05-23-2016, 12:54 PM
Hi:
Really glad there are very young people interested in the hobby. :banana:

I am 57, recent retired from Boeing, and I learned electronics from a former military and civilian electronics technician in high school, as a three year certificate program that earned you 1 full year at the local community college (way before "Running Start" type programs). My motivation was to learn to fix our household sets, and avoid those dreaded words, "It has to go to the shop." I was really into TV as a boy and teen, and watched all those 1960's sitcoms as well as the local Seattle kids shows (J P Patches, Stan Boreson, Captain Puget, Brakeman Bill) at the end of their glory days.

My dad did the basics (testing tubes at the local TV shop) and even at 5-6 years old I was always fascinated by the glow of the tubes in the back of the set when he worked on it. He worked second shift at Boeing, took the speaker out of the set, and ran speaker wire under our carpet from the TV to his favorite chair so he could watch/listen to Johnny Carson after work without disturbing us kids. So I got the bug from him too, although he was never trained in electronics.

In the 1980's I had a bunch of vintage sets from the 1950's, '60's and '70's, all with tubes, as well as several radios and parts. I was still living at home and every room had some of my collection. Mom and Dad finally said I had to get rid of the sets, and to this day I regret having to dispose of all of them. I still have a 1965 Zenith chassis 25MC33 roundy combo, and a 1967 Motorola 23" color console, but they are still at my parents house, and will have to go soon. I have no space in my current house, and my wife is not into it at all... :tears:

I am a vicarious collector these days except for recently acquired test gear and a few older transistor radios from my parents and thrift shops. The bug has not gone away...

Electronic M
05-23-2016, 01:09 PM
Hi:
In the 1980's I had a bunch of vintage sets from the 1950's, '60's and '70's, all with tubes, as well as several radios and parts. I was still living at home and every room had some of my collection. Mom and Dad finally said I had to get rid of the sets, and to this day I regret having to dispose of all of them. I still have a 1965 Zenith chassis 25MC33 roundy combo, and a 1967 Motorola 23" color console, but they are still at my parents house, and will have to go soon. I have no space in my current house, and my wife is not into it at all... :tears:

I am a vicarious collector these days except for recently acquired test gear and a few older transistor radios from my parents and thrift shops. The bug has not gone away...

It's as much your house as your wife's you should be able to claim a room or half of one for your two consoles. If there is a dry climate controlled basement or attic (extra space in the garage perhaps?) that is not finished/furnished you should be able to eek out a small collection space by repacking the stuff junk stored there more densely in a corner or disposing of a portion of it.

I've got 70% of a basement and have had north of 50 tube TVs and around 100tube radios down there. If you get serious I think you can find space for your two consoles EASILY (making it may take a bit of effort though).

oldtvman
05-23-2016, 02:21 PM
When I started this thread I posed the question because when I grew up in the 50's there were no distractions like cell phones, computers, vcr's, cable tv and life was much more basic. Like many kids of that time I grew up with all the kid favorites of that era. One day my dad to me to a tv store and there it was a tv running that had a show on in living color. After that every time I saw the Peacock on tv the envy started to build. Color tv was about as out of place as having a UFO land in your front yard. Those sets were big, clunky and had the usual reliability issues, but one thing was clear, those who had sets were fans of color forever.

wkand
05-27-2016, 01:31 AM
It's as much your house as your wife's you should be able to claim a room or half of one for your two consoles. If there is a dry climate controlled basement or attic (extra space in the garage perhaps?) that is not finished/furnished you should be able to eek out a small collection space by repacking the stuff junk stored there more densely in a corner or disposing of a portion of it.

I've got 70% of a basement and have had north of 50 tube TVs and around 100tube radios down there. If you get serious I think you can find space for your two consoles EASILY (making it may take a bit of effort though).

I hear ya, Tom. Thanks for the inspiration to hang in there, LOL. I am working on alternatives. I have some relatively modern stereo equipment I am going to get rid of to make some room etc. My wife is fine with all of it, ultimately. I did not mean to make it sound like she's the buzz kill...She knows I like my stuff. Also, the house we're in is really too small for either of us, and developers are sniffing around since we are near 2 state highways, and they want to increase housing density in our part of town. I can hold off the need to move the sets out of my folks' house as my brother lives there by himself. The definition of "soon" in my earlier post is a bit more fluid and less dire than I indicated...

There will definitely need to be a "collectibles" room in the new dwelling...BUT we like our debt free financial state, and I do not want to jeopardize that either...

Decisions, decisions...:scratch2:

N2IXK
05-27-2016, 06:51 AM
WHAT was the street that had the REALLY "Good" electronic junque shoppes on it, it was COMPLETELY obliterated by the WTC complex ? It was a REAL "Radio Row", & about any kind of tube, widget, hooberbloob you could name was likely there, in abundance ? There was a Rat's warren of streets there, that they completely did away with...

You must be thinking of Canal Street and/or Cortland Street.

"Radio Row" went away to build the WTC. All that remains are a couple shops selling cell phone accessories and car stereo crap...:thumbsdn:

timmy
05-27-2016, 01:03 PM
At 56 and born in 60 I went threw the 60s watching a Sears color roundie that the service guy was constantly by to fix something and one day at probably age 8 or 9 there was a tube next to the hv cage and the service guy would tell me to push the tube to the side if the picture turns green and I remember the tube was not lit until I pushed it. This would never happen today, to much liability on the part of the company that would have sent the tech.

wa2ise
05-27-2016, 02:20 PM
"people collect old barbed-wire, door-knobs.....so why not old televisions..." referring to it as being pretty odd.

In the 69's TV show "Bewitched" Samatha had a relative Aunt someone who collected door knobs. Presented as something totally wacky, that no normal person would be interested in doing.... :D Later in the episode that this was mentioned, it was a plot device to explain a few missing doorknobs in Samatha's house...

You must be thinking of Canal Street
I remember paying too much for a POS reel to reel machine there back around 1974. 20 years later I had occasion to go there, along with a Chinese friend, and Canal St had become a Chinatown extension.

kschrief
05-31-2016, 01:27 PM
I'm a 25 year old Software Developer, born in 1991. I feel I'm within the last few years of the pre-internet generation. I got a small taste of what life was like before anyone and everyone could do just about anything with technology, and it was always interesting to me what people could and couldn't do before all the moderm miracles I grew up with (That some of the even younger people on here would laugh at me for calling miracles). As I started to really research the technologies available before I was born, I became more and more fascinated. Things that I took for granted as a basic necessity (Color TV, Cable TV, Video game consoles, etc) were being introduced as futuristic revolutions, and things that were obsolete and unnecessary (B&W TV, OTA Broadcasting) were all that most people had. And some people didn't even have that. And that was only 30 or so years before I was born. Go back another 10 years, and you were the talk of the neighborhood if you had a set at all!

After the novelty of "Ha, that TV's old" wore off, the technology itself is what fascinated me. What's the difference between transistors and tubes? What's different between analog and digital signals, despite being on the same frequencies? How can I convert one to the other? How can I get something from the 90s to play on a TV from the 80s? How can I get something that came out a week ago to play on that same TV? How can I set up a microtransmitter to bring portable units into the mix? Should I really hook up an Xbox 360 to a 1.5" Watchman? With each experiment, each more absurd than the last, I'm learning more and more about television and broadcasting technology both old and new. And with it has come the desire I see from just about everyone here to keep, restore, and preserve the older technologies. I've absolutely learned the roots of where everything we take for granted nowadays has come from, and I've gained a very deep respect for that.

tom franco
06-10-2016, 03:13 PM
I remember my parents total automatic color magnavox used to love waiting for the tv repair man so when he pulled the bac off I could look in side loved those days and my grandpa having to full tube caddys him always giving me tubes

truetone36
06-17-2016, 06:09 PM
I'm 47 and have been collecting old TV sets most of my life. I've had a few people think I'm weird and I've had to deal with a few wisecracks over the years, bur I don't mind. There are young people out there who appreciate this stuff and I think there always will be. I used to go to the junk shops around town and pick up 50's B/W sets for next to nothing and color roundies really cheap too. I bought my first color set, a CTC-5, for $1. People thought I was nuts then but the value of some of these sets has gone through the roof. I'll probably collect sets for the rest of my life, since I haven't found either of my "Holy Grail" sets yet. There's a Royal Sovereign out there in a barn somewhere waiting for me to find it, lol.

Steve D.
06-18-2016, 02:29 PM
You must be thinking of Canal Street and/or Cortland Street.

"Radio Row" went away to build the WTC. All that remains are a couple shops selling cell phone accessories and car stereo crap...:thumbsdn:

Cortland Street was "Radio Row." Here's a site devoted to the death of Radio Row:
http://www.qcwa.org/radio-row.htm. You can also Goggle "Radio Row" for more sites.

-Steve D.

NowhereMan 1966
06-26-2016, 12:59 PM
I'm a 25 year old Software Developer, born in 1991. I feel I'm within the last few years of the pre-internet generation. I got a small taste of what life was like before anyone and everyone could do just about anything with technology, and it was always interesting to me what people could and couldn't do before all the moderm miracles I grew up with (That some of the even younger people on here would laugh at me for calling miracles). As I started to really research the technologies available before I was born, I became more and more fascinated. Things that I took for granted as a basic necessity (Color TV, Cable TV, Video game consoles, etc) were being introduced as futuristic revolutions, and things that were obsolete and unnecessary (B&W TV, OTA Broadcasting) were all that most people had. And some people didn't even have that. And that was only 30 or so years before I was born. Go back another 10 years, and you were the talk of the neighborhood if you had a set at all!

After the novelty of "Ha, that TV's old" wore off, the technology itself is what fascinated me. What's the difference between transistors and tubes? What's different between analog and digital signals, despite being on the same frequencies? How can I convert one to the other? How can I get something from the 90s to play on a TV from the 80s? How can I get something that came out a week ago to play on that same TV? How can I set up a microtransmitter to bring portable units into the mix? Should I really hook up an Xbox 360 to a 1.5" Watchman? With each experiment, each more absurd than the last, I'm learning more and more about television and broadcasting technology both old and new. And with it has come the desire I see from just about everyone here to keep, restore, and preserve the older technologies. I've absolutely learned the roots of where everything we take for granted nowadays has come from, and I've gained a very deep respect for that.

I was born in 1966, I turn 50 next week. :p I've done a lot of the same things you did, one time I hooked up my Playstation to a 1969 Sony B&W TV, I can still play the games, but when it came to "chocobo breeding" in Final Fantasy VII, I had no idea what color chocobo I would get. :) BTW, FYI, "chocobos" are a staple in the Final Fantasy series, basically it looks like a cross between an ostrich and a chicken and people can ride them or use them to pull wagons. Most chocobos are yellow like a baby chick but in FF VII there are rare ones of other colors that can give them special abilities.

Hagstar
06-27-2016, 05:07 PM
Video and radio technology is so basic to modern life a restored working set like a porthole or color roundie gets a LOT of attention from my young snowboarding friends. They often build their computers and can write/debug code so there's a certain continuity as the geek has become the cowboy of the silicon prairie. What's amazing to them is it's all pieces parts and wires, or early printed circuits a good warm breath will lift the traces from.

BUT what matters is is it cool looking and does it work. However for TVs a lot more looks cool to them as the young ones never saw anything but black plastic box CRT televisions that still litter the curbs here.

John H.

Freon
10-05-2017, 10:33 PM
Well I stumbled on this a little late. Hope nobody minds the bump.

I can name so many reasons why old TVs are fascinating and collectible to millenials and Generation Z. I am 18 myself and just starting college. I've "been into" and daily used CRT TVs and monitors since I was 3 when my first memories were of playing Sonic 2 on a Sega Genesis hooked up to a black Zenith set. My bedroom at home has a 26" Mitsubishi console TV, my current dorm room has a 19" Sylvania Superset.

For starters the tech behind CRTs, especially color tubes, is pretty insane. Three little guns firing electrons through a vaccum at the speed of light, guided by magnets through tiny holes to hit just the right spot so certain phosphors light up into a certain color. And it does it so fast the human eye just sees it as a solid image.

Vintage TVs had absolutely beautiful designs. They are pieces of furniture in their own right and often add flourish to a room as a conversation piece, living antique, an nostalgia-inducing reminder of our past as we continue racing towards new technological advancements. I wish 70s era woodgrain and chrome industrial design would come back in a big fashion. Way too much aluminum and glass these days. (Thanks, Apple...)

My love of CRTs is intertwined with my love of old videogames and old tech in general. Atari, Nintendo and Sega home consoles produced hundreds of legendary games that set a gold standard in a new industry and still hold up to the test of time and are genuinely as fun as if not more fun than today's multi-million cinematic fare. The classics just do not look and play as intended on modern LCDs with lag-inducing scaling and heavy post processing intended for digital images.

Almost everybody my age will write off CRTs as old news, heavy inefficent junk to dump in the landfill or use as target practice. I feel contractually obliged to keep alive a part of our history and of my childhood, if no one else will. It was the venerable boob tube that we watched man land on the moon. Television, Internet video and videogames owe their existence to them.

MadMan
10-06-2017, 02:23 AM
^ Well said.

I haven't much of a tv collection at the moment, but I've always appreciated old things and have collected stuff from a young age. I don't know that it's nostalgia for me, but old things have always held a certain intrigue and romance for me. Maybe that is nostalgia... idk.

LADR
10-06-2017, 08:27 AM
I almost believe me and Tom (Electronic M) are the youngest members here that are so involved with old televisions like this.

I'm 29, and I was born in 1986. My earliest memories are of that Zenith Television I still have, and use this day. Unusually my memory began to retain stuff as early as Late 1987, according to mom when

Im 16 turning 17 this month so i might youngest one on here.

Sandy G
10-06-2017, 10:51 AM
I DID manage to do a little exploration in NYC.. Big-dealed my parents into seeking out the Rolls-Royce dealership. This VERY-well dressed guy came out to"Wait" on me.. The Rolls were ALL locked up & I asked Cuthbert if I could see the motor..."I'm Sorry, SIR, we do NOT open the bonnets in the showroom.. I asked him if they had any catalogs, he produced a VERY small piece of literature, & I got the distinct impression that WE weren't really welcome in there at all..I wanted to go to the Mercedes dealership, it was 180 degrees away from R-R's place. There were 2 guys in the showroom, both were chowing down-It WAS lunchtime. I asked if I could check the cars out, & one of the sales guys said,"Knock yerself out,Kid., have yrself a BLAST"... They had all the Mercedes that they sold in the USA, & I was in, out, over & Around the cars.. They even had a 600 Pullman that had 3 doors on each side. I told them my Dad had a 250 sedan,& THAT tickled them. They gave me half-a-truckload of catalogs & brocheres,& even though it was obvious we WEREN'T in the market for a new car, they still treated me like I'd just written a check for that 600 Pullman... I WASN'T in the market right then, but I MIGHT HAVE Been at some point in my life. The Rolls' crew made me feel like the proverbial red-headed stepchild, but the Mercedes folks made me feel as if I was "Somebody"...It really would not have "Hurt" if they'd been nicer to me.. I told them of the reception I got at Rolls', they chuckled & said,"Yeah, that SOUNDS like them..."

Sandy G
10-08-2017, 09:30 AM
It STILL is Big Fun to usher a blase',smart-alec kid into the "Ship's Radio Room", & flip on my Zenith Porthole.. a number of kids nowadays claim to have NEVER seen a B/W tv, & ESPECIALLY a Porthole... It, often as not,even makes GIRLS sit up & take notice... Most young'uns will go along w/you & agree that we had a reasonable amount of goodies, even as far back as their birthday. But anything B4 that, you've GOTTA be pulling their leg..

Kevin Kuehn
10-08-2017, 11:17 AM
Very Funny, Sandy! I'm still upset that the industrial revolution started without me being on the planet. :nono:

mr_rye89
10-08-2017, 11:59 AM
I'm fairly young still and I've always been into weird old crap. The tube bug bit sometime in the mid 00s, built my first tube amps during my senior year of high school/freshmen of college ('06-'08). I've restored many radios since 2013, built a nice WE91A styled 300B amp in 2014, got my first tube B&W TV in 2015....

I've also been into Sony Walkmans and on Tapeheads since '09

The next step is to get a color roundie.....

Sandy G
10-08-2017, 12:24 PM
They REALLY think I'm blowin' Smoke up their behinds when I tell 'em that my RCA AR-60 was $495 in 1935,when you could buy a new Ford V-8 that year for $650. Or that my Rohde & Schwarz EK-07 cost the German Gov't some $6000 in the mid Sixties... I'll tell 'em they can HAVE the EK, but they gotta move it by themselves, no help allowed.At its 150 LBS, & the fact its on the bottom rung of a shelving unit, nobody has ever seriously TRIED to move it. I Picked it up solo when I 1st got & I saw moons, stars, planets, & damn near dropped it, I've NEVER done THAT again..

NowhereMan 1966
10-08-2017, 06:29 PM
Well I stumbled on this a little late. Hope nobody minds the bump.

I can name so many reasons why old TVs are fascinating and collectible to millenials and Generation Z. I am 18 myself and just starting college. I've "been into" and daily used CRT TVs and monitors since I was 3 when my first memories were of playing Sonic 2 on a Sega Genesis hooked up to a black Zenith set. My bedroom at home has a 26" Mitsubishi console TV, my current dorm room has a 19" Sylvania Superset.

For starters the tech behind CRTs, especially color tubes, is pretty insane. Three little guns firing electrons through a vaccum at the speed of light, guided by magnets through tiny holes to hit just the right spot so certain phosphors light up into a certain color. And it does it so fast the human eye just sees it as a solid image.

Vintage TVs had absolutely beautiful designs. They are pieces of furniture in their own right and often add flourish to a room as a conversation piece, living antique, an nostalgia-inducing reminder of our past as we continue racing towards new technological advancements. I wish 70s era woodgrain and chrome industrial design would come back in a big fashion. Way too much aluminum and glass these days. (Thanks, Apple...)

My love of CRTs is intertwined with my love of old videogames and old tech in general. Atari, Nintendo and Sega home consoles produced hundreds of legendary games that set a gold standard in a new industry and still hold up to the test of time and are genuinely as fun as if not more fun than today's multi-million cinematic fare. The classics just do not look and play as intended on modern LCDs with lag-inducing scaling and heavy post processing intended for digital images.

Almost everybody my age will write off CRTs as old news, heavy inefficent junk to dump in the landfill or use as target practice. I feel contractually obliged to keep alive a part of our history and of my childhood, if no one else will. It was the venerable boob tube that we watched man land on the moon. Television, Internet video and videogames owe their existence to them.

I'm glad to see more young people get into this. I'm the same way. I was born in 1966 and would like to preserve some things from my childhood. I'm watching my 1982 Zenith as we speak and it has been in use since I was 16. I have nothing against flat screens, they have their place, they are good for limited spaces and so on, but I like the old tube TV's. I do have a flat screen but it was my mother's, she passed away 4 year ago and while she was sick, my aunt, her sister, bought her flat screen.

Sandy G
10-08-2017, 10:24 PM
One thing that people will maybe miss is curling up on their Mama's lap & watching the big 21"-24" Zenith B&W set in the corner. No A/C back then, but you DID get a nice "Homey" smell when the Zenith was on, & for about 1/2 the year, you were kinda GLAD for all the heat it put out.My Mom wouldn't smoke w/moi curled up in her lap, wished I'd done that more often, we might have gotten to keep her a bit longer COPD/Emphysema got her eventually...

dtvmcdonald
10-09-2017, 11:10 AM
I like the Rolls/Mercedes story. Mine is Porsche. I tried to buy a Porsche 911 when
I got tenure. I visited the dealer and loooked and looked at it. They were uninterested.
I asked if I could sit in it to check the driving position. NO!! "You can drive it when you
buy it". No, I said, I don't need to drive it, just check the sitting position. "NO!"

So I left and came back a few hours later with a certified check to them for the
sticker price plus tax. I showed it to them and they STILL said "NO". Amazing!
So I bought a Corvette. They had let one of my students drive me around in it ...
I demurred as it had been a few years since I drove a stick shift. But ... this was
a dealer in St. Louis, across the street from the then-factory. Our local dealer had
acted very snooty too, but would have sold me an automatic, just not a stick shift.

I sold the vette 12 years later and paid for a month long vacation in Papua New
Guinea with the proceeds (sold privately to a porn dealer!)

Electronic M
10-09-2017, 11:49 AM
They REALLY think I'm blowin' Smoke up their behinds when I tell 'em that my RCA AR-60 was $495 in 1935,when you could buy a new Ford V-8 that year for $650. Or that my Rohde & Schwarz EK-07 cost the German Gov't some $6000 in the mid Sixties... I'll tell 'em they can HAVE the EK, but they gotta move it by themselves, no help allowed.At its 150 LBS, & the fact its on the bottom rung of a shelving unit, nobody has ever seriously TRIED to move it. I Picked it up solo when I 1st got & I saw moons, stars, planets, & damn near dropped it, I've NEVER done THAT again..

If I ever end up in your neck of the woods you gotta remember NOT to try that stunt with me....At least if you wanna keep your EK. :D I've had 2 Sony widescreen CRT sets (a 30"@148LBS and a 34"@208LBS) in the last year, and was able to move both on my own....The 'little one' I could lift and move anywhere by myself except stairs narrower than the front of the set (most stairs)....Must have walked 150' with it without issue. The big one I was able to lift from floor to the top of the poor unfortunate 1971 Zenith console that has become it's stand. :D I can walk (in Dr. Strangelove German accent: Mine fuhrer I can vwalk!:banana:) with the big one if it is at ~chest height before I pick it up...Otherwise I need some unfortunate object to rest it on soz I can readjust my posture/purchase.:D I was able to do all that without seein' the lucky charms cereal mellers spinnin' round me. :thmbsp:

The active TV collector fitness regiment: If it does not kill/injure you, it WILL make you STRONGER.:banana::D

Sandy G
10-09-2017, 01:47 PM
When I got the EK,that was before I had my stroke, B4 I fell/was pulled down my back stairs by a VERY exuberant Dobermann,& screwed up my meniscus & quadricept, & I just WAS almost as strong as a bear... When I was10-11, I could pick up my mom, plant her on my hip, & grin at her as she squalled for me to "Put Me DOWN !!", as I stomped thru the house... She'dfuss & fume,I'djust grin at her & go,"Aww, Winifred,HUSH !" If me, my dad,or my sister ever called her "Winifred", that was sort of HER cue to pay attention to what we were saying...If we called her "Winnie", she paid almost no attention at all, but "Winifred", she'd straighten up & fly right. Her best buddy always called her "Winifred" if she wanted Mama to pay attention, guess that's where WE picked it up from... That little girl, Bethany, that I ran around with, she had a Father, but not a Daddy, he apparently NEVER ever"Woolled" her,, I'd sling her over my shoulder, while simultaneously smackin' her on her Behind.., singing,"Oh-Wee oh, Oh-WEE-Oh.. She ate that kind of stuff up..She's 25 now, too big for me to horse around with, & ever since I boogered my knee up,I never know when it is gonna show its arse,& just collapse... Bethany has 2 young 'uns, a boy who's 4, & a girl who's 2 & a half, despite how much I'd LOVE to"Rough House" w/them, I wouldn't try for fear of possibly hurting them...It AIN'T worth it...

Jon A.
10-09-2017, 06:14 PM
The active TV collector fitness regiment: If it does not kill/injure you, it WILL make you STRONGER.:banana::D
Word up! I've pushed four big TVs ~7 clicks home on a trolley, brought 19" sets and a U-Matic home on buses as well as doing a lot of other heavy and awkward work on my own. I've gotten hit with the "You're going to injure/kill yourself" chestnut a few times but I'm still standing and feeling fine. I rarely even get sore after such a job, temporarily weakened after bearing an object's full weight for too long but that's it. I've gotten worse from carrying groceries, darn bag handles will dig into my fingers and cut off the circulation leaving a spot where I can't feel much of anything for days/weeks at a time.

Sandy G
10-10-2017, 09:41 PM
When I was a Kid, I was strong enuf to basically do ANYTHING I wanted to. Would carry 2 hay/straw bales-One in each hand when we were putting up hay. Actually, carrying one in each hand like that was easier than trying to handle just one. The only time I ever really "Overloaded" myself was when I picked up a 289 Ford "Short block" motor. But I came by being strong fairly honestly-My Dad had no idea how strong HE really was. I don't remember my dad EVER "White-Eyeing" on ANYTHING. He basically had NO idea of how strong he REALLY was.

Electronic M
10-11-2017, 12:11 PM
Word up! I've gotten worse from carrying groceries, darn bag handles will dig into my fingers and cut off the circulation leaving a spot where I can't feel much of anything for days/weeks at a time.

My trick for plastic grocery bags especially in winter with my arms padded is to loop the handles over my arm...They don't noticeably dig in that way and I can hoist a carts worth of bags to make unloading the car a 1-2 trip affair.

MadMan
10-12-2017, 12:31 AM
I've gotten worse from carrying groceries, darn bag handles will dig into my fingers and cut off the circulation leaving a spot where I can't feel much of anything for days/weeks at a time.

Game is hard. (https://www.amazon.com/Shopping-Grocery-Carrier-Kitchen-IDS/dp/B074SLTK52/ref=sr_1_26?ie=UTF8&qid=1507782631&sr=8-26&keywords=grocery+bag+carrier) <3 Also, that's probably bad for you.