View Full Version : ETF YouTube channel


Steve McVoy
05-23-2015, 10:15 PM
Check out our new YouTube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuPxvfS9a88axMOueu1rzLg

old_tv_nut
05-23-2015, 11:27 PM
Super!

radiomec
05-25-2015, 01:54 AM
Very nice movies! Thank you for sharing them! My best wishes for your crt rebuilding projects!

rrrhre2s
05-25-2015, 08:01 AM
I watched the video:
The Craft of Picture Tube Rebuilding
I noted that there was a radio playing in the background.
I didn't see every song listed at the end.
Wonder if the copyright cops will be all over this video?
Even though it's copyrighted !
Hope they are soon rebuilding tubes in their on lab.

rrrhre2s

TheShanMan
05-25-2015, 02:40 PM
I just watched that video too and the one thing I wish it also demonstrated was recoating the phosphors. Coming from the arcade hobby, screen burn is the biggest CRT problem so that's why I'm so interested in that. Any footage of that you can post?

Steve McVoy
05-25-2015, 02:59 PM
Look at the RACS short videos. Some of them deal with re-phosphoring.

Electronic M
05-26-2015, 02:05 AM
I just watched that video too and the one thing I wish it also demonstrated was recoating the phosphors. Coming from the arcade hobby, screen burn is the biggest CRT problem so that's why I'm so interested in that. Any footage of that you can post?

Two big holes for your bubble:

1: Most talk I've heard from the ETF don't seem to indicate intention to rebuild tubes newer then roundy color CRTs.

2:Rephosphoring is only practical for monochrome tubes. The proper equipment for silk screening the color phosphor dot patterns for color tubes was found only at the factories that made them. that process is exorbitantly expensive and technologically challenging......Even nearly all the old CRT rebuilders never rephosphored color tubes.....Once they're burned they are burned and that is the end.

On color arcade monitors your best bet would be to reduce brightness to minimum watchable levels, and if that ain't enough maybe set up an under-scan, and modify it with some system to continuously slowly shift the centering....Or just live with the burn.

TheShanMan
05-26-2015, 02:25 AM
I wasn't suggesting that I was hoping for this to become practical anytime soon. It's just what peaks our curiosity. The practical solution for the arcade hobby is tube swapping from trashed TV's. That said, keep in mind that there are plenty of black and white arcade games too.

Turning down the brightness doesn't really help with screen burn though. What people tend to do (other than tube swaps or just living with it) is turn it *up* and use smoked glass or plexi in front of the screen.

old_tv_nut
05-26-2015, 10:08 AM
Two big holes for your bubble:
......Even nearly all the old CRT rebuilders never rephosphored color tubes.....

As far as a I know, NEVER done, because it would require separating the face assembly from the bell. The phosphor dot pattern in a color tube is unique to the particular shadow mask used in that tube. The process requires inserting and removing the shadow mask three times. There were attempts at making interchangeable masks and faceplates, but even then it would be necessary to disassemble the face assembly parts from the bell in order to re-pattern the face.

Electronic M
05-27-2015, 12:02 AM
As far as a I know, NEVER done, because it would require separating the face assembly from the bell. The phosphor dot pattern in a color tube is unique to the particular shadow mask used in that tube. The process requires inserting and removing the shadow mask three times. There were attempts at making interchangeable masks and faceplates, but even then it would be necessary to disassemble the face assembly parts from the bell in order to re-pattern the face.

I was fairly sure it was never done as you've said, but the moment ya deal in absolutes someone will point out an exception....

colorfixer
05-27-2015, 06:13 AM
The object secondary to of course keeping vintage TVs alive would be to generate needed income for the museum.

Doing some of the color arcade tubes that are unobtainium would certainly create a niche for them. Re-phosphoring a 19VARP4 from say an Asteroids is do-able, but these are still relatively easily had.

TheShanMan
05-27-2015, 11:00 AM
Some of the B&W raster games had 23" monitors which almost always have noticeable burn and those are hard to replace.

I wonder what kind of prices are/will be involved in rebuilding CRT's? I assume for the most part, they're high enough that arcade collectors won't be ready to jump on board, but as time goes on that will start to change.