View Full Version : Uhd bluray format has been finalized


etype2
04-09-2015, 07:20 PM
HDR, Rec.2020 color gamut and much more ...

http://www.flatpanelshd.com/news.php?subaction=showfull&id=1424247161

ChrisW6ATV
04-14-2015, 04:43 PM
Excellent news!

Now I know what to aim for when I replace my existing main viewing equipment, which may not happen for a couple of years or more. By then, lots of equipment should be available with the new version(s) of HDMI connectors and so on, and some of the expected bugs should be worked out.

What I hope for at some point is to buy a 79-inch or larger UHD display for perhaps $2500 or less. That could replace both a 46-inch flat panel and a 92-inch projection screen, without too much compromise on screen size but with a big boost in convenience.

jr_tech
04-14-2015, 04:53 PM
Curved screen and organic LED would be nice as well!

jr

CoogarXR
04-15-2015, 09:28 AM
I've been out of the loop on new technology. What's the benefit of the curved screen? Seems like you would only get the proper picture if you sit directly in front of it.

andy
04-15-2015, 11:19 AM
I've been out of the loop on new technology. What's the benefit of the curved screen? Seems like you would only get the proper picture if you sit directly in front of it.

If you ask most people into home theater, they would say the curve is just because they can, and because they need something to stand out. Not that long ago, they were going out of their way to make TVs flat, and now they're back to making them cured (admittedly in the opposite direction). The fact that virtually all of the new OLED TVs have been curved has been very controversial. About the best thing most people have said about the curve is that it isn't too noticeable if you sit in the right place. I haven't heard many people say they like the curve. I wouldn't even consider buying an OLED until they get rid of the curve.

Personally, I'm not that excited about UHD. It's only of any visible benefit for extremely large screens (larger than most UHD sets). On the negative side, it has hastened the demise of plasma, and delayed the development of OLED, leaving us stuck in an LCD only world.

In my opinion, they should have waited until HD had been perfected before pushing UHD. To me, that means something better than LCD, plus a cable/sat/streaming signal in full 1920x1080 HD with no visible compression artifacts. It drives me nuts that providers are going on about UHD when they can't even provide a good HD picture. Some providers don't even pass the full 1920x1080 resolution.

jr_tech
04-15-2015, 12:18 PM
Interesting! A matter of personal preference, for sure. I got used to curved screen TV back in the days of front projection sets from Advent and others. The later rear projection sets were disappointing to me, but at least "better" in that respect than CRT screens that were curved the "wrong way".

jr

andy
04-15-2015, 03:42 PM
Interesting! A matter of personal preference, for sure. I got used to curved screen TV back in the days of front projection sets from Advent and others. The later rear projection sets were disappointing to me, but at least "better" in that respect than CRT screens that were curved the "wrong way".

jr

Speaking of those old curved projector screens, I have an 80" Advent screen setup in the basement with an NEC 9PG projector. While it's not as sharp, the image really pops compared to my main Epson LCD projector. The curve doesn't bother me (probably because it's a necessary part of the technology rather than just for looks).

I agree that the early rear projection TVs were pretty bad. It didn't help that they always had an inch of dust on the lenses (which point up), dirty coolant, and a smoke coated mirror (not to mention bad convergence setup).

Eric H
04-15-2015, 06:59 PM
Curved because of Cinerama?
Personally I think it just adds distortion but I suppose it does add to the "Immersive" experience, if only one person is watching and sitting dead center..

etype2
04-15-2015, 07:33 PM
Curved because of Cinerama?
Personally I think it just adds distortion but I suppose it does add to the "Immersive" experience, if only one person is watching and sitting dead center..

I can see that. I think the curved screen is a gimmick. In the average living room, I don't see how it will help much. Prefer a flat screen. Always have been an early adopter to new technologies, so I welcome UHD.

http://www.visions4.net/journal/wp-content/uploads/1977-Stereo-video-system_525-WP_edited-1.jpg

The above photo shows my first "home theater". Photo was taken in 1978. Featured is a 6 foot Advent 750, with SAE audio components. You may notice the first generation JVC Vidstar VTR, Marantz SLT12U turntable and Sony KV 7010UA. Bose 901 speakers are outside the field of view.

The screen was curved to focus the light to the sweet spot viewing position. Three people setting together on a sofa could see the image well enough. If you got up or walked to the side the image almost disappeared.

jr_tech
04-15-2015, 07:52 PM
Pioneer R-R??

jr

etype2
04-15-2015, 08:00 PM
Pioneer R-R??

jr


Don't understand?

jr_tech
04-15-2015, 08:05 PM
Sorry... the 10.5'' reel to reel tape deck, is it a Pioneer?

jr

etype2
04-15-2015, 08:10 PM
Sorry... the 10.5'' reel to reel tape deck, is it a Pioneer?

jr

It's a Sony TC-854. Solenoid controls.

Correction: TC-850

CoogarXR
04-16-2015, 08:19 AM
About the only technology I immediately jumped on was DVD. I bought a Creative Labs DXR2 setup for my PC because (at $229) it was cheaper than a stand-alone DVD player at the time (and I could read DVD-rom discs as a bonus). It had a decoder card that had composite outputs that I ran to my 1983 Sylvania Superscreen 46". I ran the audio to my old pro-logic setup. It was a pretty sweet setup for the time. I think I have a picture of it somewhere.

bills
04-17-2015, 09:24 PM
Stay away from OLED'S they have life Issues, they degrade very quickly.

http://www.cnet.com/news/seven-problems-with-current-oled-televisions/

Lifetime - While red and green OLED films have longer lifetimes (46,000 to 230,000 hours), blue organics currently have much shorter lifetimes (up to around 14,000 hours

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/oled5.htm

ChrisW6ATV
04-18-2015, 03:18 AM
The current generation of OLED screens are probably much better than the first ones (the $2500 10-inch Sony set, supposedly all of which have lost their blue output as of now). However, since I have seen "burn-in" or "image retention" even on a one-month-old Samsung OLED cell phone that was running its demo mode daily, I am indeed hoping that true LED (non-organic) display panels come on the market before too many years go by.

andy
04-18-2015, 12:11 PM
The current OLED TVs used a white OLED film with RGB color filters, so blue lifetime shouldn't be an issue. Burn in is possible, but the same is true for CRTs (although harder). I believe they're comparable to plasma for burn in.

Nothing lasts forever. I've seen burn in on LCDs and even DLP, but those were extreme cases.

etype2
04-19-2015, 09:15 AM
The burn in on the LG WOLED sets are usually caused by having the dealers set them in torch mode with a static display running all day. In the home, it is unlikely that this would occur. Soposedly, the second generation sets are using new algorithms to prevent burn in.

Jeffhs
05-10-2015, 03:14 PM
I never had any kind of home-theater setup until I bought my flat-screen TV almost four years ago, and even then it isn't really HT since my stereo system isn't hooked up to the TV (although I have the cable to do it). My system consists of the following:

1. Insignia 19" flat-screen TV

2. Panasonic PV-4022 VCR

3. LG BP-220 Blu-ray player

4. Aiwa NSX-888a bookshelf stereo system, 50 watts per channel, capable of surround sound (not currently using the rear channel amps)

5. Roku streaming video player (used in place of cable, but cable line remains connected to TV for TWC TV local channel app to work)

As you can see, my system is nothing fancy, but it works for me. I would have patched the TV into the stereo long ago, except the TV doesn't have variable audio outputs so I wouldn't be able to mute the sound (an important feature for me, since I mute the commercials all the time). I have no intention of upgrading to UHD or curved screen, as I don't see the advantage of a curved UHD (aka 4K) screen over a standard LCD flat panel.

I guess large UHD screens have uses in digital signage, as sports scoreboards and the like, but for home use, I think a practical limit would be about 32 inches. However, some folks, VK member ChrisW6ATV for one, have systems with much larger screens, but his is a projection set, with the projector mounted on the ceiling and projecting to a 92-inch (!) screen some distance away. This is by far the largest TV picture I have ever heard of, although I have read of at least one company that is working on a 100-inch LCD or OLED display. I don't know the name of the company, but I wouldn't expect their super-size TV screens in American living rooms, unless someone wanted one as a status symbol. Such a large display would be so large and heavy that the room in which it is placed would have to be the size of the state of Alaska, and moving it would be a problem as well.

Edit: My TV does have audio output jacks after all; I didn't think of them when I wrote this post. I have two sets of RCA pin jacks on a panel at the left side of the set, in addition to two 3.5-mm audio jacks, one being the headphone output, the other an input for computer audio (the latter is located near the VGA input jack). If either of these jacks provide TV audio (I'm sure the headphone jack would, but the computer audio jack would not since it is an input), I could use them with a cable to connect to my stereo system; then I would have my audio and mute problems solved. I'll test the headphone jack tonight to see if its audio is muted with the remote's mute button. It should be, and if it works, I'll go ahead with the other connections. The audio system in my flat screen TV is nothing to write home about, anyway (two 3" speakers mounted such that they talk to my TV stand, and the television's own audio system probably isn't that great either, stereo [!] though it is), so hooking up to the stereo system will make a noticeable difference.

Electronic M
05-10-2015, 04:42 PM
My system consists of the following:

1. Insignia 19" flat-screen TV

2. Panasonic PV-4022 VCR

3. LG BP-220 Blu-ray player

4. Aiwa NSX-888a bookshelf stereo system, 50 watts per channel, capable of surround sound (not currently using the rear channel amps)


As you can see, my system is nothing fancy, but it works for me. I would have patched the TV into the stereo long ago, except the TV doesn't have variable audio outputs so I wouldn't be able to mute the sound (an important feature for me, since I mute the commercials all the time).

That AIWA is probably new enough to have remote volume control (and many remote capable stereos also have a mute button) if you configure your universal remote to map the volume and mute keys to the stereo, then you should be in business.
If that don't work here is another idea: If your TV has external speaker connections make an adapter that connects them to your stereo's audio in jacks....It may sound crazy but I've done it before with other amplifiers and had it work decently.

etype2
05-10-2015, 04:52 PM
You don't have to be wealthy to own a large flat panel or projection system. It is not uncommon for projection screens to be 120 inch diagonal or larger.

For UHD, it is recommended that the screen be at least 75 inches diagonal to realize the benefit of 4K.

I have an average size viewing room in an average size home and by no means wealthy. Currently using a 70 inch flat panel with separate speakers on both sides and 7.1 surround sound. Because of the speakers, I can only go up to about 80 inches screen size. Way back in 1978 was watching on a 6 foot screen. In the 80's and 90's was watching on a 10 foot screen in normal size homes.

jr_tech
05-10-2015, 09:12 PM
I guess large UHD screens have uses in digital signage, as sports scoreboards and the like, but for home use, I think a practical limit would be about 32 inches.

IMHO, 32" TVs might have been a fairly practical limit in CRT days, although frightfully heavy CRT TVs were made in sizes up to 40".

Today, the whole scene has changed:
1. Improved resolution allows one to sit *much* closer to the screen... the current guidelines indicate that the optimum viewing distance is 1.5 to 2.5 times the screen diagonal. This works out to 4 ft to 6.7 ft for viewing a 32 inch screen. This size is pretty tiny for most living rooms.
2. Weight has been reduced considerably... IIRC the 40" CRT sets were more than 400 lbs, while a modern 60" HDTV is around 60 lbs.
3. Price has dropped considerably on HDTVs, with some 60" models being sold for well under $1000.

jr

etype2
05-16-2015, 04:45 PM
Update: http://hdguru.com/ultra-hd-blu-ray-spec-released/#more-15923

etype2
05-17-2015, 10:23 AM
This article describes in detail the new Blu Ray spec, particularly the expanded color space. At the bottom of the article graphic representation.

http://hometheaterreview.com/the-colors-the-thing-that-will-make-4k-so-amazing/#00The%20Color%20of%204K

ChrisW6ATV
05-19-2015, 03:44 AM
Thank you for posting that update.

etype2
08-13-2015, 11:15 AM
Additional details leak.... Digital bridge and more.

http://www.flatpanelshd.com/news.php?subaction=showfull&id=1439207705&utm_source=MadMimi&utm_medium=email&utm_content=UHD+Blu-ray%27s+Digital+Bridge+detailed+-+Samsung+abandons+Project+PX+-+TV+cord+cutting+accelerates+-+Eizo+announces+144Hz+IPS+gaming+monitor&utm_campaign=20150813_m126937068_FlatpanelsHD+-+August+13%2C+2015&utm_term=_0D_0ABlu-ray_27s+Digital+Bridge+can+transfer+movies+to+USB+ hard+drives

ChrisW6ATV
08-14-2015, 02:38 AM
Large-screen UHD/4K TV sets keep going down in price, so by the time I may replace my projector with a 4K flat-panel, these players may be on the market.

etype2
08-14-2015, 09:52 AM
Large-screen UHD/4K TV sets keep going down in price, so by the time I may replace my projector with a 4K flat-panel, these players may be on the market.

Yup. LG claims they have reached 80% yields without defects with their WOLED 4K panels. The prices should then continue to drop for those as well. I just saw a brand new, LG 2014 last year model 55 inch, 1080P WOLED set available for 1999.00. This thing used to sell for 6K.

I'm holding out until the 4K BluRay players are available and the new sets are fully capable of displaying the new standard, ie:, extended color gamut, HDR, etc. That should come soon, although it might take a while befor we see extended color gamut color programming.

ChrisW6ATV
08-14-2015, 11:57 PM
Regarding display technology, I will probably stick with standard LCD if I replace my projector, and watch to see if non-organic LED displays begin to appear eventually. THAT could be the ultimate in quality!

4K Blu-ray is a definite buy, though. That is the main source I expect to have for UHD content.

mgross0
09-22-2016, 09:53 PM
Yes, OLED's can get image retention just like a plasma display panel. The LG we have in the store also has pixel orbiter and screen image restorer built in, just like a PDP. I have to say that it works quite well. As far as curved displays......We put our Samsung rep through the ringer over this one, and he made a couple of admissions. Firstly, they only did it because LG was doing it. Secondly, the main picture benefit was that it was easier to maintain even color and brightness from the center point to the corners on a curved screen, given the limitations of the full array lighting at the time. I guess it was an easy way to help with the dynamic contrast. So there you go. On a more personal note, they just look stupid.