View Full Version : From West Virginia


atomicomatic
06-09-2014, 02:42 PM
I came across this forum on the internet and so far I really like it.

I have a measly collection (if you can call it that) which consists of a 1958 or 59 Zenith blonde b&w console, a 1950 Admiral b&w console which I found in an antique shop, a 1964 Sears Silvertone stereo and a 1960 Magnavox Custom.

I like Forward Look Chryslers and mid century modern furniture. I also like old clothes too.

Sandy G
06-09-2014, 04:28 PM
Welcome ! Where in WVA ?

atomicomatic
06-09-2014, 04:50 PM
Charleston, I should have mentioned that... :scratch2:

Sandy G
06-09-2014, 07:42 PM
Kewl. A college roommate & frat brother was from there.

DavGoodlin
06-09-2014, 09:50 PM
Thanks for dropping by. That's a good start on a tube set gallery, especially the Admiral.

egrand
06-09-2014, 10:17 PM
Welcome, I like your clock!

TV's and Forward Look Chryslers huh? Well, we've just been talking about both, and the CBS Television City in Hollywood in this thread: http://videokarma.org/showthread.php?p=3106444#post3106444

atomicomatic
06-09-2014, 11:05 PM
Thanks for all the comments, and I also forgot to mention my 1956 Admiral portable. I did a cosmetic restoration on it, it needs re-capped though.

I got the picture of the clock off google, someone bought my (not really :tears: ) atom shaped one from the same antique shop which I got the Admiral console.

The Forward Look was just about the only time the Chrysler corporation came close to overthrowing the other big 2. Quality issues in early production cars proved disastrous, to the point that they rusted away in a matter of five years tops. They had some really space age designs though.

Kamakiri
06-10-2014, 07:05 AM
The Forward Look was just about the only time the Chrysler corporation came close to overthrowing the other big 2. Quality issues in early production cars proved disastrous, to the point that they rusted away in a matter of five years tops. They had some really space age designs though.

You're not kidding about rust. I learned my lesson on what was my dream car that I bought a couple years ago. Ended up selling the car and putting a roof on my house instead :)

Username1
06-10-2014, 07:12 AM
WOW cool, is that like a '58 Coronet...?

I like those '57, 58 Dodge & Chryslers & Plymouths very neat designs....

Little Blue Christene....

Hey atomicomatic good to have ya- !

Kamakiri
06-10-2014, 07:14 AM
'58 Plymouth Savoy Club Coupe. Awesome looking car with absolutely horrendous build quality. Everything in the car was very tin canny too. But damn, was it sharp! :)

Username1
06-10-2014, 11:24 AM
Yah, a lot of cars from back then looked like they were made in someones back
yard if you looked close enough.....

I like those models a lot, especially Christine... very hot car....

Yours has the same V on the grill.... was yours the same year/model as Christine...?

The '57's had different size inner and outer headlights right....?

Nice fins on them too....

atomicomatic
06-10-2014, 01:07 PM
His has the V because it had the V8 engine (unless it was added later). The 57-59 Chrysler cars rusted godawfully. Your car looks like a survivor compared to some.

The 1960 cars were sharp and reliable, and pretty good sellers compared to Chrysler's earlier blunders. Bad management made Dodge enter the same price field as Plymouth (a mistake which would cost Plymouth it's life), and most of next year's cars were horrendous (ex: the backwards fin Dodges).

Nice car man.

Username1
06-10-2014, 04:30 PM
The Captain's car looks like its in good shape... Does not look rusty at all, still
he b up in rust land X 10....

Sandy G
06-10-2014, 07:49 PM
Part of the problem was that the "Deep Draw" metal-stamping technology that provided cars of the late Fifties w/their heroic soaring fins, & swoopy shapes, was in its infancy, & not well understood. Neither was rustproofing as well developed as it is today. The new stampings often left sheet metal too thin. The 1957 Ford had intricate stampings around its headlight buckets, & they were rust prone.

egrand
06-10-2014, 08:09 PM
Part of the problem was that the "Deep Draw" metal-stamping technology that provided cars of the late Fifties w/their heroic soaring fins, & swoopy shapes, was in its infancy, & not well understood. Neither was rustproofing as well developed as it is today. The new stampings often left sheet metal too thin. The 1957 Ford had intricate stampings around its headlight buckets, & they were rust prone.

True, and GM cars had the same problems in the same areas. Part of it too was they didn't have good splash guards to keep water spray out of those places.

Remember, on average people only kept cars 3-5 years then too. And, the used car market was different then. A 1957 Chrysler wasn't going to get much trade in value in 1962, rusty or not. The Forward Look car's design aged pretty quickly in the early 60s.

Sandy G
06-10-2014, 08:34 PM
An EXCELLENT book from 1958 on the foibles of cars then is "The Insolent Chariots" by a fellow named John Keats. He pretty much skewers the automobile industry. And while MUCH has changed, there is a LOT that sadly hasn't changed. Remember, in antebellum 1958, Detroit OWNED the American car market, imports were almost not really worth mentioning, except for the Volkswagen, which was looked on as a sick joke by a lot of insular Detroit. They never really understood the VW, their attempts to "Answer" the VW-Falcon, Valiant & Corvair-attest to this, altho the Corvair came reasonably close.

atomicomatic
06-10-2014, 09:42 PM
The 1960 model cars took rustproofing to a whole new level- with the new unibody construction for all divisions except Imperial, they HAD to be rust proof. I don't know of many severely rusted 1960 cars.

Yes, by the mid 60s, the big finned wonders (not just Chrysler's offerings) were noticeably outlandish looking compared to the clean lines of the new cars coming out. By the 70s the majority of people hated finned cars.

Sandy G
06-10-2014, 10:13 PM
I'm a BIT prejudiced, but just look at the difference between a '59 Caddy & a '61 Lincoln.. The Cad is a Merry-Go-Round, the Lincoln is coolly sophisticated..I can only imagine the reaction when it came out in late 1960... Cad was backing away from the "Theater of the Absurd" design as quickly as they could. Chrysler hired Elwood Engel, the main ramrod behind the '61 Connie, away from Ford, & his ideas produced the 1964 Imperial, which did away w/Mopars' fins once & for all..

atomicomatic
06-11-2014, 01:40 AM
I should've noticed the Lincoln avatar.

Myself, I'm a bit prejudiced as well. Exner had a heart attack in 59-60, so the design team was pretty much on autopilot. Not many people liked the 61 cars, and the 62 models were downsized after a rumor that GM was downsizing their cars.

The rumor was not true, and sales suffered, no room for small cars in a big car market...

At least he had some insight for the 63 cars, the last ones he took part in.