View Full Version : Small Sony black and white tv model?


zenith2134
05-28-2014, 11:04 PM
I was given this set a while ago and only recently got to powering it up. It's a 12VDC only set with VHF/UHF. The UHF is on the right side. It is cosmetically rough, but works as new. The antenna is missing so I jammed a dipole rod into the hole where the original went. It gets crystal clear reception from one of my blonder-tongues, but I'm going thru a move currently and my collection is set aside in the interim.
Anyone recognize this set? It's from the early 70s AFAIK.
The sound doesn't work at all and I haven't opened it yet. Using a 12 volt wall wart which originally went with a 802.11g wifi router, it is capable of 2.5Amperes and the set has a ton of emission.

Jon A.
05-29-2014, 03:03 AM
Nice, that's how I'm powering my Uniden Bearcat scanning radio. Luckily the fool who fed it 15 volts AC before I got to it didn't damage it.

Anyway, neat little set, never saw another like it. 5" screen?

Sandy G
05-29-2014, 10:12 AM
Pretty sure those were Sony 5-300 series sets, some outfit modified 'em for 12VDC, & called 'em "Stericall"... Don't understand WHY they modified them to use 12VDC, maybe it was protection against theft.

dieseljeep
05-29-2014, 10:17 AM
Nice, that's how I'm powering my Uniden Bearcat scanning radio. Luckily the fool who fed it 15 volts AC before I got to it didn't damage it.

Anyway, neat little set, never saw another like it. 5" screen?

Some of the equipment has a series diode in the power input to avoid damage by using the wrong adaptor, either reverse polarity or AC.

etype2
05-29-2014, 10:36 AM
Looks to be a Sony TV-510U from 1972. 5 inch tube, AC/12 volt operation.

zeno
05-29-2014, 11:45 AM
Pretty sure those were Sony 5-300 series sets, some outfit modified 'em for 12VDC, & called 'em "Stericall"... Don't understand WHY they modified them to use 12VDC, maybe it was protection against theft.
Probably an arm set from a hospital. Down here they modded them
for 24 VAC through the antenna coax connector. Made them a real
PIA to fix .
Dont know why, they could run on 12 VDC & they just rectifide the
25 VAC & dropped it to 12 V inside. Must be another dumb ass
government reg. to drive costs up.:thumbsdn:
Old Sony B&W's used to get the legs of the IF transistors rot off,
did quite a few.

73 Zeno:smoke:

zenith2134
05-30-2014, 07:22 PM
Hmm, I was mistaken, mine is AC and DC. Thanks for the info regarding year. I have 3 or 4 other Sony small b/w sets from this era. My favorite is the TV-720U. It has a fantastic pic and works like new.

dr.ido
06-03-2014, 09:13 AM
I had a couple of AWA 5 inch sets that were modded by a TV rental company for use as patient sets in a hospital. They removed the internal tranformer and rod antenna. 12VDC and the RF signal entered the set via a triaxial connector that was rigidly mounted on the little cart.

I figured this was done to in part to prevent theft (if they weren't bolted to something a little 5 inch sets are bound to go missing, at least back then) and also to prevent people watching them if they hadn't paid for the privilege. If you didn't pay the outboard power supply was turned off with a key switch. Removing the standard connectors meant you couldn't just plug them in to the outlet.

When I was last in hospital in 2010 the patient sets were still the same ceiling mounted 14" CRT sets that has been there since the early 90s. They were modified to be controlled by the mulitfunction handset that also controlled the lights and buzzer. Everyday some would come by to either collect the money or delete the channels from memory with a preprogrammed remote. If was stuck in there for longer and didn't have a laptop I'd have had someone bring me in a universal remote.

zeno
06-03-2014, 11:32 AM
I was in the hospital a few times back in '03. All the arm sets
were gone which were 5" Sony B&W's or later colors. Another we
did work for used the last real Zenith 9" sets before they went with
a crappy ROK set.
In '03 they had NAP flats with unwatchable pictures, RCA CTC175's
hospital sets all with real weak jugs & some 9-181 based 19"
Zenith hospital sets still running perfect.

73 Zeno:smoke:

zenith2134
06-10-2014, 11:51 PM
When one of my relatives was dying in a hospital in Manhattan in '03, they had Magnavox sets from the early 90s on wall mounts in the patient rooms. They couldn't be shut off...I tried to shut one down and it simply went into a blanking state, I could hear the horizontal frequency increase. Not sure why...there was probably an override in the system someplace. Most patients and nurses probably couldn't even hear/detect the 15kHz normal horiz osc freq..

dieseljeep
06-16-2014, 10:46 AM
I was in the hospital a few times back in '03. All the arm sets
were gone which were 5" Sony B&W's or later colors. Another we
did work for used the last real Zenith 9" sets before they went with
a crappy ROK set.
In '03 they had NAP flats with unwatchable pictures, RCA CTC175's
hospital sets all with real weak jugs & some 9-181 based 19"
Zenith hospital sets still running perfect.

73 Zeno:smoke:
What kind of a depressed area hospital was that?
I was in the hospital in August 2003, first time in my life, at age 57.
I spent seven days in the ICU. Those rooms were just remodeled four months before my stay. The TV was a 20" Zenith Healthview, that was installed at the time of the remodel. It seemed like satellite sourced programming.
The older rooms, still had NAP built Sylvania's. I didn't see a poor performing set in the whole place. :thmbsp:

dr.ido
06-17-2014, 12:00 AM
Around here the hospitals (at least the few that I have been in either as a patient or a visitor) vary a lot depending on which section you are in and whether you are a public or private patient.

A friend in the private section got a flat screen with cable that included the "premium" channels. A friend in yet another section got nothing at all in his room and the communal set in the lounge area was a Philips K12 from around 1979 with rabbit ears - a decent set, but this one was getting tired and the rabbit ears weren't helping.

Where I was in 2010 (which was in the process or extending and upgrading at the time, so it's probably different now) had mostly 90s BPC CRT sets in patient rooms, though some rooms had already gotten LCDs. Communal areas were a mix of both older and newer CRTs and some LCDs, but they were all running off the same in house feed of remodulated analog over the air channels and a couple of in house channels. The picture was pretty bad regardless of what set you were looking at.

That said I consider it a good thing that I got through it intact enough to nitpick about the TVs at all.