View Full Version : Advice on transporting a floor model TV?


jmetal88
07-07-2013, 09:49 PM
If someone else doesn't get to it first, I may be picking up this TV about 60 or 70 miles from where I live. Now, I've never transported a floor model TV, so I was hoping for some advice. Here's a picture of the set in question:

http://www.videokarma.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=179259&stc=1&d=1373247613

The plan is to pick it up while I'm bringing the pickup I'll be borrowing from my dad back to town before I move into my new apartment, and I'm pretty sure I'll have to transport the TV in the bed of the truck. So apart from wrapping it in a blanket or something, what's the best way to assure it arrives at my place intact? Should I try to keep it upright, or would I be alright laying it on its side? I'm hoping I won't need to remove the chassis for transport, but if I should, please tell me so! I haven't asked the seller what the model or chassis number is yet, so I don't really know anything about what's inside, but I love the look of the set so I told him I'd buy it if he still has it when I inquire again.

ChrisW6ATV
07-07-2013, 10:09 PM
To me, standing upright is the best option, as that is the way the set is designed to be used. For the best security, face the screen forward, and if the truck has those loop anchor points at the four corners of the top edge of the bed (or if you can pick up a couple of them-cheap at auto parts stores), tie a rope or strap around the set from the left front anchor to the right front one. Ideally, you would check inside the cabinet first to be sure the chassis is held down by at least two of its original screws, too.

Second best position, if necessary, is to have the set face down, but then you need to have the chassis secured for sure, and you also need to add supports (2x4s maybe) under its corners or elsewhere to be sure it does not lean on the knobs or their shafts.

jmetal88
07-07-2013, 10:31 PM
The truck does have anchor points in the corners of the bed that I was planning to use. It's good to know that face down is better than on its side in the event that transporting it upright is impractical. I'm hoping it's not all that tall so I'll be able to keep it upright, though. I might have to look in my dad's garage before I leave with the truck to see if he has any scrap lumber I could use for supports just in case.

egrand
07-07-2013, 10:45 PM
Nice looking set. I would really try to keep it upright if possible. Put it in the front driver's side corner and strap it in at least two directions. Another good thing to take along is some sand bags and you can put them around the legs at the bottom. Main thing is to keep it from sliding or tipping, and take curves nice and easy.

hi_volt
07-07-2013, 10:59 PM
Also, make sure you leave clearance around the neck of the picture tube where it sticks out the back of the cabinet so it doesn't get pushed in or crushed. I'd use plenty of blankets and face the TV towards the cab of the pickup, making sure there's plenty of padding so you don't damage the knobs. If you can get furniture straps, that would be better than rope for securing the set. Good luck.

jmetal88
07-07-2013, 11:03 PM
Also, make sure you leave clearance around the neck of the picture tube where it sticks out the back of the cabinet so it doesn't get pushed in or crushed. I'd use plenty of blankets and face the TV towards the cab of the pickup, making sure there's plenty of padding so you don't damage the knobs. If you can get furniture straps, that would be better than rope for securing the set. Good luck.

Thanks! I have at least two furniture straps available, I'll make sure to bring them along.

jmetal88
07-07-2013, 11:07 PM
Nice looking set. I would really try to keep it upright if possible. Put it in the front driver's side corner and strap it in at least two directions. Another good thing to take along is some sand bags and you can put them around the legs at the bottom. Main thing is to keep it from sliding or tipping, and take curves nice and easy.

Thanks for the advice! I just really hope it's still there when I have the time to go get it. I'll have to wait almost two weeks before I'm ready to borrow the pickup for my move. The seller acted like he hasn't had any other interest in the set, though, so I'm hopeful about it. He's also trying to sell a bug-eye table model Zenith, but I'm not as interested in that one.

vts1134
07-08-2013, 06:20 AM
Thanks for the advice! I just really hope it's still there when I have the time to go get it. I'll have to wait almost two weeks before I'm ready to borrow the pickup for my move. The seller acted like he hasn't had any other interest in the set, though, so I'm hopeful about it. He's also trying to sell a bug-eye table model Zenith, but I'm not as interested in that one.

Good luck on the new set...and greetings from Pittsburgh :scratch2:.

old_tv_nut
07-08-2013, 11:25 PM
No matter how you transport it be sure to open it up and look for anything loose first!
Make sure the chassis is tightly mounted. Make sure there are no loose spare parts left by a repairer. If the high voltage section has a cover make sure it is fastened down and not just laying loose.

jmetal88
07-08-2013, 11:56 PM
No matter how you transport it be sure to open it up and look for anything loose first!
Make sure the chassis is tightly mounted. Make sure there are no loose spare parts left by a repairer. If the high voltage section has a cover make sure it is fastened down and not just laying loose.

Alright, I'll bring along a few screwdrivers. Hopefully it doesn't use anything too unusual. The tabletop Zenith I have currently just uses Phillips head screws on the outside, and hex head screws on the chassis.

jmetal88
07-12-2013, 10:47 PM
I think I called the guy just in time on this set. The Craigslist listing has actually expired since I contacted him, so if I hadn't done it right then I probably would have lost my chance! As of right now, I'm set to pick up the set next Friday at 7 or 8 in the evening, provided I give the guy a reminder Thursday that I'm coming for it. I'll probably ask him for directions then. Google Maps claimed to know where the address is when I searched for directions, but I have my doubts, considering when I searched the address by itself it gave me the 'vague dot' rather than the pinpoint.

jmetal88
07-20-2013, 11:06 AM
I got it home safe and sound! The only damage that occurred during transit were a few minor chips out of the wood on the rear legs, but since other areas of the cabinet already had minor damage, the new damage doesn't look that bad. This thing is a lot bigger than I was expecting, though! Model number is D2460M. I'm afraid the pictures don't do it justice, though. This thing is absolutely beautiful, even with the cabinet damage (which I'm pretty sure I'll leave in place, at this point, although I might try to re-finish just the top panel).

My only problem now, though, is that I'm not sure I have enough space to actually work on it! It'll just have to serve as a decorative piece until I'm finished moving, then I can actually open it up and see if I have enough room to keep the chassis out and replace the capacitors. My new roommate keeps telling me I should put a flat panel screen inside it, and I just keep giving him that "Are you nuts?" look in return.

The guy I bought it from told me that, when he acquired it, he had plugged it in and was able to get a 'dim picture' from a VCR, so I'm hoping there's not a lot wrong with the set that replacing the capacitors won't fix. I guess it might be worth picking up a CRT tester/rejuvenator and perhaps some proper alignment equipment just in case.

The thing that surprised me with this set when I looked at it was how it was marketed as a Hi-Fi model -- it actually has two speakers in the bottom, as well as treble and bass controls!

Phil Nelson
07-20-2013, 11:27 AM
I wouldn't waste money on a CRT tester or alignment equipment at this stage. Many TVs can be successfully restored with nothing more than a soldering iron and a simple multimeter (which tests resistance, voltage, etc.).

This article tells how to test whether a tube is a dud using a multimeter:

http://antiqueradio.org/FirstStepsInRestoration.htm

Many TVs come back to life with nothing more than recapping and basic cleaning (tube pins, controls, etc.). If you don't have a lot of spare room or money, I'd hold off on buying stuff that you might not need.

This page lists various TV restoration articles that you might find interesting in a general way, although none of my sets is exactly like yours:

http://antiqueradio.org/televisions.htm

Phil Nelson
Phil's Old Radios
http://antiqueradio.org/index.html

jmetal88
07-20-2013, 12:17 PM
I wouldn't waste money on a CRT tester or alignment equipment at this stage. Many TVs can be successfully restored with nothing more than a soldering iron and a simple multimeter (which tests resistance, voltage, etc.).

This article tells how to test whether a tube is a dud using a multimeter:

http://antiqueradio.org/FirstStepsInRestoration.htm

Many TVs come back to life with nothing more than recapping and basic cleaning (tube pins, controls, etc.). If you don't have a lot of spare room or money, I'd hold off on buying stuff that you might not need.

This page lists various TV restoration articles that you might find interesting in a general way, although none of my sets is exactly like yours:

http://antiqueradio.org/televisions.htm

Phil Nelson
Phil's Old Radios
http://antiqueradio.org/index.html

Well, this'll be my second time fixing a tube TV, so I was mainly thinking for the future if this becomes a major hobby for me. For the first set I worked on, I used a lot more guesswork than I should have and ended up throwing off the IF alignment because I didn't know what I was doing, which is what got me thinking about getting more appropriate testing equipment. My dad has a general-purpose tube tester that I used when working on my first set, but it has no capabilities for testing a CRT.

I do really appreciate those links though, and I'll be sure to give them consideration when starting work on this set!

Chip Chester
07-20-2013, 01:09 PM
I realize you've achieved your stated goal, but here are a few more tips on moving fragile things for future readers:

If you can move it in a passenger vehicle, the ride will be much smoother for your treasure. Minivan with the middle seats removed gives you secure, weatherproof storage with appropriate hold-down locations.

Use non-elastic hold-downs if you're not resting the device on a cushion/absorber. So, if you're tied to the vehicle, make sure it can't move, and then "snap back" due to bungee cord elasticity. Better to be secured so there's no movement possible.

If you are placing it on cushions, then bungees may be appropriate, if loaded correctly.

If you're moving one small item in a truck that rides harshly, load it down with some other well-secured, heavy items. That way the suspension is more forgiving. Same with trailers -- a good load will help control bouncing and harsh impacts.

And finally, like noted in earlier posts, spend most of your effort on controlling sudden deceleration movement. Second, side-to-side. And finally, movement due to acceleration. The last one is the one that's most in your control.

Glad you arrived with minimal damage, and happy fixin'!
Chip

old_tv_nut
07-20-2013, 03:30 PM
Good! Have fun!

jmetal88
07-21-2013, 10:47 PM
Alright, I've just had it open (I know I should have done so before I picked it up, but I forgot to bring a screwdriver), and I have found evidence to indicate it has a weak CRT: a brightener was inside the cabinet!

But here's the weird thing: the brightener looks like it was never installed. It was simply sitting inside the cabinet, next to the chassis, in its original box.

Electronic M
07-25-2013, 10:01 PM
Nice set that is a 1959 Zenith and the cabinet style is called the Glenlake(according to my 1959 Zenith TV full line poster).

Since no one else has mentioned the obvious as a owner of almost the same set(mine is not HiFi and in different styled cabinet) I'll tell you that the tuning knob on yours is wrong for that set(it is either from an RCA CTC7-11 or a mid 60's monochrome Zenith IIRC).

BTW on RCA and Zenith TVs the chassis number is a better identification of the electronics than the model. Back then Zenith and RCA would put the same chassis in MANY different models and the model number would reflect stuff like the cabinet style and finish and electronic options(ie. UHF tuner, HiFi audio circuitry and remote control). RCA chassis numbers start with three letters(CTC## for a color TV, and KCS### for a monochrome TV) and then numbers. Zenith chassis nubers usually are two numbers, 1-2 letters, and then two more numbers and some times a post fix letter(ie. 16C21). Zenith tends to put the chassis number on a sticker on the side of the HV cage that faces you when you pull the back off.

Tubejunke
08-04-2013, 11:21 AM
I have a like new 24" crt, Space Command chassis and tuner, and main chassis for this line of sets. I couldn't give mine away, much less make my capacitor money back, so I was forced to scrap it. Anyway, I think that they are nice sets and supposedly great performers. It's just hard to move floor model anything these days unless it's a P.O.S. Predicta! LOL IF you need any parts, drop me a line.

dieseljeep
08-04-2013, 11:34 AM
The channel selector knob is from an early 60's Zenith, lower priced table model or console.
Some of the Zenith tuner knobs of the day could be easily repaired. They sold replacement parts for them.

jmetal88
08-04-2013, 11:59 AM
Since no one else has mentioned the obvious as a owner of almost the same set(mine is not HiFi and in different styled cabinet) I'll tell you that the tuning knob on yours is wrong for that set(it is either from an RCA CTC7-11 or a mid 60's monochrome Zenith IIRC).

You sure about that? It's exactly the right size for the space available and the window on the front lines up perfectly with the light bulb behind the knob in the cabinet.

EDIT: You may be right, I did just find this picture of a similar set (although I can tell by the shadows in the grille cloth that the speakers are in a different arrangement than in my cabinet).

http://www.tvhistory.tv/1959-Zenith-C2358R.jpg

jmetal88
08-04-2013, 12:04 PM
I have a like new 24" crt, Space Command chassis and tuner, and main chassis for this line of sets. I couldn't give mine away, much less make my capacitor money back, so I was forced to scrap it. Anyway, I think that they are nice sets and supposedly great performers. It's just hard to move floor model anything these days unless it's a P.O.S. Predicta! LOL IF you need any parts, drop me a line.

Alright, the only obvious thing that it looks like I might need for this is the deflection yoke cover. But I haven't gotten into the electronics, yet, so I don't know if I'll need anything there. Right now I have the cardboard yoke cover I made for my tabletop Zenith installed, and the centering rings for this set actually had little metal clips to hold them on, so it's working better in here than it did in my tabletop Zenith.

jmetal88
08-04-2013, 12:19 PM
BTW on RCA and Zenith TVs the chassis number is a better identification of the electronics than the model. Back then Zenith and RCA would put the same chassis in MANY different models and the model number would reflect stuff like the cabinet style and finish and electronic options(ie. UHF tuner, HiFi audio circuitry and remote control). RCA chassis numbers start with three letters(CTC## for a color TV, and KCS### for a monochrome TV) and then numbers. Zenith chassis nubers usually are two numbers, 1-2 letters, and then two more numbers and some times a post fix letter(ie. 16C21). Zenith tends to put the chassis number on a sticker on the side of the HV cage that faces you when you pull the back off.

It's supposed to be a 17D20 chassis.

Oh look! Here's a picture of the front of the Photofact in an eBay auction, and it has a knob like mine!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1960-ZENITH-17D20-TELEVISION-SERVICE-MANUAL-PHOTOFACT-SCHEMATIC-17D20Q-17D20U-/350836805056

I definitely think my set has the correct knob.

Eric H
08-04-2013, 02:25 PM
I believe the channel knob is correct.
I junked a 59 Zenith similar to that and that's the knob it had.
I had the knob and tuner sitting in my garage for years until recently when I tossed it.