View Full Version : Cool little GE B&W Portable


StarMover
04-28-2013, 08:25 PM
Check this out. It was tucked away in a back bedroom in my parents house. I'm thinking its from around 1975. Love the styling. Seems to work. Model SF1702YL

http://www.videokarma.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=178515&stc=1&d=1367195040

radiotvnut
04-28-2013, 08:34 PM
Nice TV! Judging by it having a click-stop UHF tuner and the control knob style, it's no older than '75 and could easily be from '76. The SF chassis is a tube/transistor hybrid and I think it was produced almost as long as the tube portacolors; which, were around until at least '78.

StarMover
04-28-2013, 08:55 PM
Thanks for the information. I think the most interesting aspect is the styling. I can't imagine it's worth anything.

Sandy G
04-28-2013, 09:11 PM
Thanks for the information. I think the most interesting aspect is the styling. I can't imagine it's worth anything.

Well, no, maybe not, but its from yr MAMAW'S house, it should always remind you of her..Then its PRICELESS..

StarMover
04-28-2013, 09:14 PM
It will make a good nick nack. Perhaps I can convert it into a mini bar!

Sandy G
04-28-2013, 09:56 PM
NOOOOOO.... Keep it as a TV, like it is..You can still rig something up to let it play like it was supposed to...Astound kids ! Marvel yr contemporaries ! Its a NEAT relic from a time long past...

twbranch
04-28-2013, 11:08 PM
Whata beaut!

AiboPet
04-29-2013, 10:09 AM
That's definately right up my alley for "small and quirky". I would gone NUTS to have it if I saw that somewhere.

As far as "not worth anything"....it actually would do well on ePAY. Those "Eames era" quirky little JVC sets with the real styling end up going for quite a bit. No reason to think this set wouldn't either.

From this one pic...this thing looks nearly mint, with bright unfaded yellow...all knobs...and appears to have a full antenna. It would deffinately be in MY watch list

Celt
04-29-2013, 10:50 AM
Very cool set! :cool:

compucat
04-29-2013, 12:11 PM
I have alway liked that model and would be pleased to find one in such good condition. Definitely a keeper.

StarMover
04-29-2013, 04:35 PM
Yes, it appears to be complete, antenna is intact! (so often they are broken). I slipped off the back of the case to dust it out and yes, it does actually have a couple of tubes inside. ALso, it works! Yeah, although I can only pick up one station off the air. I need to connect it to the cable and see what the picture quality looks like.

ChrisW6ATV
04-29-2013, 07:39 PM
I think the most interesting aspect is the styling.
Genuine 1970s "Harvest Gold"!

dieseljeep
04-30-2013, 10:24 AM
Genuine 1970s "Harvest Gold"!

I got one of those several years ago as a freebee.
It was branded SEARS. I never knew GE built sets for Sears. It was a plain brown plastic case, but the same style. I gave it away, as the CRT was really weak.
Back then, any set that was labeled SEARS, was the lowest priced, leader type product. :yes:

radiotvnut
04-30-2013, 12:52 PM
I think GE made this type of set and a 22" solid state B&W console for Sears. Other than that, I know of no other GE-built Sears TV's.

electroking
05-01-2013, 10:21 AM
Yes, it appears to be complete, antenna is intact! (so often they are broken). I slipped off the back of the case to dust it out and yes, it does actually have a couple of tubes inside. ALso, it works! Yeah, although I can only pick up one station off the air. I need to connect it to the cable and see what the picture quality looks like.

Grab one of those ATSC-to-NTSC converters, and see what's actually on
the air. You know what those are, don't you?

StarMover
05-01-2013, 06:46 PM
No, I am a speaker guru, but a vintage TV nubie so please enlighten me!

Electronic M
05-01-2013, 09:02 PM
I'm surprised you've never heard of them. It was being crowed about all over radio and TV a few years back during the DTV transition.
It is sort of like a cable box for over the air(only once you buy it you don't have to keep paying to use it). They stopped nearly all transmitting of TV signals in a format that set can naturally receive a few years back...Soon there will be nothing transmitted in a format that set can tune on it's own. Basically all over the air TV signals are digitally encoded nowadays so that HD and or multichannel SD broadcasts can fit in the bandwidth of an old analog SD channel only problem is that older sets were not designed to decode this signal.
A converter box basically tunes the digital signal, decodes it and converts it into the type of signal your set uses. You do have to connect the RF out of the converter box to your set for it to work though.

StarMover
05-01-2013, 10:12 PM
Thanks Tom! I'll keep my eyes open for one.

radiotvnut
05-02-2013, 02:29 AM
Don't buy an APEX box because they are total garbage. Look for a digitalstream, Insignia, Zenith, or Channel Master. The Funai-built Magnavox/Philco boxes seem to hold up; but, are not quite as sensitive as the other brands. I think radio shack still sells DTV converter boxes and they are available on ebay.

The box will have an antenna input coax connector and an output coax connector. Connect an antenna to the input and connect the output of the box to the VHF antenna terminals of the TV. For this set, you'll likely need a 75 ohm to 300 ohm matching transformer (balun) in order to connect the coax cable to this TV (older TV's usually don't have 75 ohm coax inputs, they only have two screws for VHF and two screws for UHF for connecting 300 ohm twin-lead). Once connected, turn everything on and set the TV channel selector to the output channel of the DTV converter (usually channel 3 or 4). Then, follow the directions that came with the DTV converter as far as auto programming the channels. You may have to adjust the fine tuning knob on the TV for the best picture. This knob is the large outer knob around the main channel selector knob.

With OTA digital broadcasting, the signal will either be "all or nothing". That means that you'll either get a crystal clear picture or one that is unwatchable. In the analog days, a weak signal would cause a bad picture; but, it was still usable. I was trying to watch the news down in the shop a little earlier; and, despite it being a strong station and that I had a good antenna connected to the DTV box, the sound and picture kept cutting in and out. I almost blew a gasket and threw it all out in the backyard.

Rod Beauvex
05-08-2013, 11:27 AM
As an aside, there are also frequency converters for analog cable, where they input the analog cable signals, for those carriers still broadcasting it, and outputs 2-13 on VHF, and 14-83 on UHF. Great for basic cable on on older sets that can't tune cable frequencies. They're kind of hard to find these days though, both the converters and cable companies still providing analog basic cable.

AVeturri
05-08-2013, 02:53 PM
That's a really cool G.E.
Did you know that the SF chassis was used in the monitor for the vintage video game, Computer Space?
.Nostalgic